In the sight of . . .(Separate page)

      Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with . . .

     i n    t h e    s i g h t    o f  . . .       (  7  RELATED  PHRASES )                                  

                  The  words  In the sight of . . .  appears  1,848  times in the writings of Ellen G. White             See page on original site                                                   The word  In the sight of God  appears  1,039 times  and will be a separate page soon

              . . . in the sight of God   ( 1,039 )     

                     abomination in the sight of God   (  )

                  +    contemptible in the sight of God  (  )

                     foolishness in the sight of God  (  )

There is need of cultivating genuine humility before God. Let every soul remember that the words we utter are heard by the living Witness that is ever by our side; we may think that we have a right to criticise and to pronounce judgment, and yet that which we say may be entirely contrary to the mind and will of God. In expressing an adverse opinion of the servants of God, in cherishing a lofty sense of our own attainments, in feeling that we have need of nothing, we place ourselves in the path of darkness, and pass sentence upon the beloved of God, that is simply a sentence pronounced after our own finite wisdom, which is foolishness in the sight of God.  { RH July 18, 1893, par. 9 }

          +     Grievous in the sight of God ( 24 )   ►  Grievous sin in the sight of God  (  )

          +     live in the sight of God    (  )

              no value in the sight of God   (  )

          +    offensive in the sight of God   (  )  

          +     pleasing in the sight of God  (  )

           +    precious in the sight of God  (  )

           +    no sin is small in the sight of God   (  )

Those who are trying to purify their souls through obedience to the truth, yet who have had no opportunity of making special efforts and sacrifices for Christ and his cause, should find consolation in the thought that it is not necessarily the self-surrender of the martyr that is the most acceptable to God; it may not be the missionary whose life has been one of trial and endurance, that stands highest in heaven’s record; but that the Christian who is such in his private life, in his daily struggle with self, in the control of his passions, in cleanness of purpose, in purity of thought, in patience, meekness, and long-suffering under the test of provocation, in piety, in devotion, in holy faith and trust in God, in faithfulness in little things, representing in the home life the character of Jesus,—that such a one may be more precious in the sight of God than the man who goes as a missionary to heathen lands, or ascends the scaffold to die for his faith. { GW92 217.1 }

 

The youth of our time may become as precious in the sight of God as was Samuel. By faithfully maintaining their Christian integrity, they may exert a strong influence in the work of reform. Such men are needed at this time. God has a work for every one of them. Never did men achieve greater results for God and humanity than may be achieved in this our day by those who will be faithful to their God-given trust. Patriarchs and Prophets, page 574.3

           +    In the sight of Heaven  (  )    >   Valuable in the sight of heaven  (  )

           +    In the sight of the Lord  (  )

           +   in His sight  (  )   >   acceptable in His sight  (  )

Nothing but willing obedience on the part of those who profess to love God is acceptable in his sight. He has given to every man his work; but that work is in nowise of such a nature that the worker must needs show disrespect to any of the requirements of God's law. The wisdom and glory of every man's life is to make the ways and the will of God his will and his ways, and every one who takes a course that leads away from obedience to the law of God will meet with disappointment in his plans, failure in his life, and will suffer the loss of his soul at last. Who can afford thus to do? There is no madness in our world so disastrous as that which leads men to live in rebellion against God. We are now deciding our destiny for both time and eternity.  {RH, October 9, 1894 par. 8}

 

God does not regard all sins as of equal magnitude; there are degrees of guilt in His estimation, as well as in that of man; but however trifling this or that wrong act may seem in the eyes of men, no sin is small in the sight of God. Man's judgment is partial, imperfect; but God estimates all things as they really are. The drunkard is despised, and is told that his sin will exclude him from heaven; while pride, selfishness, and covetousness too often go unrebuked. But these are sins that are especially offensive to God; for they are contrary to the benevolence of His character, to that unselfish love which is the very atmosphere of the unfallen universe. He who falls into some of the grosser sins may feel a sense of his shame and poverty and his need of the grace of Christ; but pride feels no need, and so it closes the heart against Christ, and the infinite blessings He came to give. . . .  {FLB 133.2}
 
Many men who possess great wealth have obtained their riches by close dealing, by benefiting themselves at the expense of their fellow men; and they glory in their shrewdness in closing a bargain. Every dollar thus obtained, and the increase of every such dollar, has upon it the curse of God. Acts of oppression or deviation from the right in any way should not be tolerated in men who possess wealth any more than in those who are poor. In the sight of God all the riches that a man may possess will not atone for the smallest sin. Repentance, humility, a broken heart, and a contrite spirit are the offerings that God accepts. Wealthy men are to be more closely tested than they have ever yet been. If they stand the test, and remove the blemishes of dishonesty and injustice from their characters, and as faithful stewards render to God the things that are God’s, to them it will be said, “Well done, good and faithful servant: ... enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.” { RH December 19, 1899, par. 2 }


             My  personal  favorites

If Brother G had received the light that the Lord sent him months ago and had frankly conversed with his wife, if both had broken their hard hearts before the Lord, how different would be their present state. They both slighted the words of reproof and entreaty of the Spirit of God, and did not reform their lives. But closing their eyes to the light God had sent them did not make one of their faults less grievous in the sight of God nor lessen their accountability. They have hated the reproof which the Lord in pitying tenderness gave them. Brother G has naturally a kind and tender heart, but it is crusted over with self-love, vanity, and evil surmising. His heart is not callous, but he lacks moral power. He is a coward as soon as the necessity of self-denial and self-sacrifice is brought before him, for he loves himself. To control self, to put a watch upon his words, to acknowledge that he has done wrong or spoken wrongly, is a cross which he feels is too humiliating to lift; and yet if he is ever saved this cross must be lifted.  {4T 242.2}

 

"To obey is better than sacrifice." The sacrificial offerings were in themselves of no value in the sight of God. They were designed to express on the part of the offerer penitence for sin and faith in Christ and to pledge future obedience to the law of God. But without penitence, faith, and an obedient heart, the offerings were worthless. When, in direct violation of God's command, Saul proposed to present a sacrifice of that which God had devoted to destruction, open contempt was shown for the divine authority. The service would have been an insult to Heaven. Yet with the sin of Saul and its result before us, how many are pursuing a similar course. While they refuse to believe and obey some requirement of the Lord, they persevere in offering up to God their formal services of religion. There is no response of the Spirit of God to such service. No matter how zealous men may be in their observance of religious ceremonies, the Lord cannot accept them if they persist in willful violation of one of His commands. Patriarchs and Prophets, page 634.3
 
There are special duties to be done, special reproofs to be given in this period of the earth's history. The Lord will not leave His church without reproofs and warnings.  Sins have become fashionable; but they are none the less aggravating in the sight of God. They are glossed over, palliated, and excused; the right hand of fellowship is given to the very men who are bringing in false theories and false sentiments, confusing the minds of the people of God, deadening their sensibilities as to what constitutes right principles. Conscience has thus become insensible to the counsels and the reproofs which have been given. The light given, calling to repentance, has been extinguished in the clouds of unbelief and opposition brought in by human plans and human inventions.  {2SM 151.2}

 

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