Great Anxiety

      Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                g r e a t    a n x i e t y        (  2  RELATED  PHRASES )                           

                       The  phrase  'Great anxiety'  appears  77  times in the published writings of EGW          See page on Original site                                                                           Related phrase:   Greatest anxiety ( 39 )  below

                                          Great   anxiety      ( 77 )                                                       

 

Herod promised that if Christ would perform some miracle in his presence, He should be released. Christ's accusers had seen with their own eyes the mighty works wrought by His power. They had heard Him command the grave to give up its dead. They had seen the dead come forth obedient to His voice. Fear seized them lest He should now work a miracle. Of all things they most dreaded an exhibition of His power. Such a manifestation would prove a deathblow to their plans, and would perhaps cost them their lives. Again the priests and rulers, in great anxiety, urged their accusations against Him. Raising their voices, they declared, He is a traitor, a blasphemer. He works His miracles through the power given Him by Beelzebub, the prince of the devils. The hall became a scene of confusion, some crying one thing and some another.  {DA 729.3}

 

 

Again the indignation of the papists was aroused, and they resolved to stop the mouth of that fearless advocate of truth. They summoned him to Worms, fully determined to make him answer for his folly. He was in feeble health, yet he did not excuse himself. He well knew the dangers that were before him. He knew that his powerful enemies would take any measure to silence him. They were crying for his blood as eagerly as the Jews clamored for the blood of Christ. Yet he trusted in that God who preserved the three worthies in the burning fiery furnace. His anxiety and care were not for himself. He sought not his own ease, but his great anxiety was that the truth, to him so precious, should not be exposed to the insults of the ungodly. He was ready to die, rather than allow its enemies to triumph. As he entered Worms, thousands of persons pressed around and followed him. Emperors and others in high authority were attended with no greater company. The excitement was intense; and one in that throng, with a shrill and plaintive voice, chanted a funeral dirge to warn Luther of what awaited him. But the Reformer had counted the cost, and was ready to seal his testimony with his blood, if God so ordained.  {GW92 59.2}

 

 
Letters have come to us in regard to matters upon which God has given us no light, and we are pleased to say to these inquirers, We do not know. The great anxiety in every mind should be to know God and do His requirements. Blessed are they that hear the Word of God and keep it. . . .  {Ev 626.3}
 
We must learn to place the best possible construction upon doubtful conduct of others. . . . If we are ever suspecting evil we are in danger of creating what we allow ourselves to suspect. . . . We cannot pass along without sometimes having our feelings hurt and our temper tried, but as Christians we must be just as patient, forbearing, humble, and meek as we desire others to be. Oh, how many thousand good acts and deeds of kindness that we receive . . . pass from the mind like dew before the sun, while imaginary or real injury leaves an impression which it is next to impossible to efface! The very best example to give to others is to be right ourselves, and then leave ourselves, our reputation, with God and not show too great anxiety to right every wrong impression and present our case in a favorable light. . . .  {OHC 237.2}

 

Without a murmur Moses submitted to the decree of God. And now his great anxiety was for Israel. Who would feel the interest for their welfare that he had felt? From a full heart he poured forth the prayer, "Let the Lord, the God of the spirits of all flesh, set a man over the congregation, which may go out before them, and which may go in before them, and which may lead them out, and which may bring them in; that the congregation of the Lord be not as sheep which have no shepherd." Numbers 27:16, 17.  {PP 462.3}
 

 

                                                Greatest   anxiety      ( 39 )                                                                             

 

We feel the greatest anxiety for souls who are in the valley of decision. We feel a dread of Satan's attacks upon these poor souls. He watches his opportunity to bring his powers to bear when he sees that there is a possibility of hindering souls from deciding to be wholly on the Lord's side.  {RH, December 2, 1875 par. 7}

 

 

The parable of the good shepherd represents the responsibility of every minister and of every Christian who has accepted a position as teacher of the children and youth. The one that has strayed from the fold is not followed with harsh words and a whip but with winning invitations to return. The ninety and nine that had not strayed do not call for the sympathy and tender, pitying love of the shepherd. But the shepherd follows the sheep and lambs that have caused him the greatest anxiety and have engrossed his sympathies most deeply. He leaves the rest of the sheep, and his whole energies are taxed to find the one that is lost.  {CT 198.1}

 

With tears he expressed his anxiety for our institutions at Battle Creek. Said he: "My life has been given to the up-building of these institutions. It seems like death to leave them. They are as my children, and I cannot separate my interest from them. These institutions are the Lord's instrumentalities to do a specific work. Satan seeks to hinder and defeat every means by which the Lord is working for the salvation of men. If the great adversary can mold these institutions according to the world's standard, his object is gained. It is my greatest anxiety to have the right man in the right place. If those who stand in responsible positions are weak in moral power, and vacillating in principle, inclined to lead toward the world, there are enough who will be led. Evil influences must not prevail. I would rather die than live to see these institutions mismanaged, or turned aside from the purpose for which they were brought into existence.  {1T 106.3}

 

 

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