Honor (Highest honor)

      Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                h i g h e s t    h o n o r        (  5  RELATED  PHRASES )                      

                          The  phrase  'Highest honor'  appears  78  times in the published writings of EGW               See page on Original site                                                   Related phrase:    an honor to suffer  (  )

  Of all the gifts that heaven can bestow upon men, fellowship with Christ in His sufferings is the most weighty trust and the highest honor.  Not Enoch, who was translated to heaven, not Elijah, who ascended in a chariot of fire, was greater or more honored than John the Baptist, who perished alone in the dungeon. “Unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on Him, but also to suffer for His sake.” Philippians 1:29.  { MH 478.2} 

 

God never leads His children otherwise than they would choose to be led, if they could see the end from the beginning, and discern the glory of the purpose which they are fulfilling as co-workers with Him. Not Enoch, who was translated to heaven, not Elijah, who ascended in a chariot of fire, was greater or more honored than John the Baptist, who perished alone in the dungeon. "Unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on Him, but also to suffer for His sake." Phil. 1:29. And of all the gifts that Heaven can bestow upon men, fellowship with Christ in His sufferings is the most weighty trust and the highest honor.  {DA 224.5}  and  {CC 278.5}

 

God is the source of life and light and joy to the universe. Like rays of light from the sun, blessings flow out from Him to all the creatures He has made. In His infinite love He has granted men the privilege of becoming partakers of the divine nature, and, in their turn, of diffusing blessings to their fellow men. This is the highest honor, the greatest joy, that it is possible for God to bestow upon men. Those are brought nearest to their Creator who thus become participants in labors of love. He who refuses to  become a "laborer together with God,"--the man who for the sake of selfish indulgence ignores the wants of his fellow men, the miser who heaps up his treasures here,--is withholding from himself the richest blessing that God can give him.-- R. & H., Dec. 6, 1887.  {CS 23.3}

 

There is no caste with God. He ignores everything of the kind. All souls are of value with Him. Laboring for the salvation of the soul is employment worthy of the highest honor. It matters not what may be the form of our labor, or among what class, whether high or low. In God's sight these distinctions will not affect its true worth. The sincere, earnest, contrite soul, however ignorant, is precious in the sight of the Lord. He places His own signet upon men, judging, not by their rank, not by their wealth, not by their intellectual greatness, but by their oneness with Christ. The unlearned, the outcast, the slave, if he has made the most of his opportunities and privileges, if he has cherished the light given him of God, has done all that is required. The world may call him ignorant, but God calls him wise and good, and thus his name stands registered in the books of heaven. God will fit him up to do Him honor, not only in heaven, but on the earth.-- Gospel Workers, p. 332. (1915)  {Ev 566.1}
Will not heaven be appreciated by the worldly wise men?—O, yes; there they will find rest and peace and repose from all trifling, all ambition, all self-serving. Urge them to seek for the peace and happiness and joy that Christ is longing to bestow upon them. Urge them to give their attention to securing the richest gift that can be given to mortal man,—the robe of Christ’s righteousness. Christ offers them a life that measures with the life of God, and a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory. If they accept Christ, they will have the highest honor — honor which the world can neither give nor take away. They will find that in the keeping of the commandments of God there is great reward. { GW 349.3} 
 
  The highest honor that can be conferred upon human beings, be they young or old, rich or poor, is to be permitted to lift up the oppressed, to comfort the feeble-minded. The world is full of suffering. Go, and preach the gospel to the poor; heal the sick. This is the work to be connected with the gospel message. "The poor have the gospel preached to them" (Matt. 11:5). Colaborers with God are to fill the space they occupy in the world with the love of Jesus. . . . The love of Christ in the heart is expressed in the actions. If love for Christ is dull the love for those for whom Christ died will degenerate. . . .  {HP 173.4}

 

One reminder alone remains: Our Redeemer will ever bear the marks of His crucifixion. Upon His wounded head, upon His side, His hands and feet, are the only traces of the cruel work that sin has wrought. Says the prophet, beholding Christ in His glory: “He had bright beams coming out of His side: and there was the hiding of His power.” Habakkuk 3:4, margin. That pierced side whence flowed the crimson stream that reconciled man to God—there is the Saviour’s glory, there “the hiding of His power.” “Mighty to save,” through the sacrifice of redemption, He was therefore strong to execute justice upon them that despised God’s mercy. And the tokens of His humiliation are His highest honor; through the eternal ages the wounds of Calvary will show forth His praise and declare His power. { GC 674.2}   Read entire Chapter 42
 
  More than eight thousand of the descendants of Aaron and of the Levites waited upon David. The change in the sentiments of the people was marked and decisive. The revolution was quiet and dignified, befitting the great work they were doing. Nearly half a million souls, the former subjects of Saul, thronged Hebron and its environs. The very hills and valleys were alive with the multitudes. The hour for the coronation was appointed; the man who had been expelled from the court of Saul, who had fled to the mountains and hills and to the caves of the earth to preserve his life, was about to receive the highest honor that can be conferred upon man by his fellow man. Priests and elders, clothed in the garments of their sacred office, officers and soldiers with glittering spear and helmet, and strangers from long distances, stood to witness the coronation of the chosen king. David was arrayed in the royal robe. The sacred oil was put upon his brow by the high priest, for the anointing by Samuel had been prophetic of what would take place at the inauguration of the king. The time had come, and David, by solemn rite, was consecrated to his office as God’s vicegerent. The scepter was placed in his hands. The covenant of his righteous sovereignty was written, and the people gave their pledges of loyalty. The diadem was placed upon his brow, and the coronation ceremony was over. Israel had a king by divine appointment. He who had waited patiently for the Lord, beheld the promise of God fulfilled. “And David went on, and grew great, and the Lord God of hosts was with him.” 2 Samuel 5:10. { PP 701.3} 

 

  John’s love for his Master was not a mere human friendship, but it was the love of a repentant sinner, who felt that he had been redeemed by the precious blood of Christ. He esteemed it the highest honor to work and suffer in the service of his Lord. His love for Jesus led him to love all for whom Christ died. His religion was of a practical character. He reasoned that love to God would be manifested in love to His children. He was heard again and again to say, “Beloved, if God so loved us, we ought also to love one another” ( 1 John 4:11). “We love him, because he first loved us. If a man say, I love God, and hateth his brother, he is a liar: for he that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen?” ( verses 19, 20). The apostle’s life was in harmony with his teachings. The love which glowed in his heart for Christ, led him to put forth the most earnest, untiring labor for his fellow men, especially for his brethren in the Christian church. He was a powerful preacher, fervent, and deeply in earnest, and his words carried with them a weight of conviction. { SL 53.3} 

 

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Related Information

EGW Quotes - G-H-I Gabriel Gethsemane Gluttony God (Separate page) Gold ( pure gold ) Good (Separate page) Gospel (Separate page) Government (Separate page) Grace (Separate page) Great (Separate page) Great Anxiety Great Controversy Grievance Guile Guilt (Their guilt is . . .) Habits (Separate page) Happiness (Source of Happiness) Harmony Harsh Harvest (Last great harvest) Hate (Separate page) Hearsay Heart ( separate page ) Heaven (Separate page) Help from God Helpless History (Separate page) Holiness (Separate page) Holy Spirit (Separate page) Human (Separate page) Ignorance (Separate page) Imagination (Separate page) Important (Separate page) In the sight of . . .(Separate page) Influence (Separate page) Injustice (Separate page) Integrity (Separate page) Israel (Separate page)