Coward (28)

     Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the word . . .

                C o w a r d           (  5  RELATED  PHRASES )                      

                       The  word  'Coward'  appears  28  times in the published writings of EGW                 page not on Original site                                                                    Related phrase:  Cowardice ( 109 )  - -  

  Peter had not designed that his real character should be known. In assuming an air of indifference he had placed himself on the enemy’s ground, and he became an easy prey to temptation. If he had been called to fight for his Master, he would have been a courageous soldier; but when the finger of scorn was pointed at him, he proved himself a coward. Many who do not shrink from active warfare for their Lord are driven by ridicule to deny their faith. By associating with those whom they should avoid, they place themselves in the way of temptation. They invite the enemy to tempt them, and are led to say and do that of which under other circumstances they would never have been guilty. The disciple of Christ who in our day disguises his faith through dread of suffering or reproach denies his Lord as really as did Peter in the judgment hall. { Desdire of Ages, 712.1}  also  { CC 321.3} 

 

  There is another class of books that you should avoid, — the productions of such infidel writers as Paine and Ingersoll. These are often urged upon you with the taunt that you are a coward, and afraid to read them. Frankly tell these enemies who would tempt you—for enemies they are, however much they may profess to be your friends—that you will obey God, and take the Bible as your guide. Tell them that you are afraid to read these books; that your faith in the word of God is now altogether too weak, and you want it increased and strengthened instead of diminished; and that you do not want to come in such close contact with the father of lies. { FE 93.1 } 
I warn you to stand firm, and never do a wrong action rather than be called a coward. Allow no taunts, no threats, no sneering remarks, to induce you to violate your conscience in the least particular, and thus open a door whereby Satan can come in and control the mind. { FE 93.2 } 

 

 
  It is because of man’s sin that “the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together.” Romans 8:22. Suffering and death were thus entailed, not only upon the human race, but upon the animals. Surely, then, it becomes man to seek to lighten, instead of increasing, the weight of suffering which his transgression has brought upon God’s creatures. He who will abuse animals because he has them in his power is both a coward and a tyrant. A disposition to cause pain, whether to our fellow men or to the brute creation, is satanic. Many do not realize that their cruelty will ever be known, because the poor dumb animals cannot reveal it. But could the eyes of these men be opened, as were those of Balaam, they would see an angel of God standing as a witness, to testify against them in the courts above. A record goes up to heaven, and a day is coming when judgment will be pronounced against those who abuse God’s creatures. { PP 443.1}   Read entire Chapter 40

 

  When Abigail returned home she found Nabal and his guests in the enjoyment of a great feast, which they had converted into a scene of drunken revelry. Not until the next morning did she relate to her husband what had occurred in her interview with David. Nabal was a coward at heart; and when he realized how near his folly had brought him to a sudden death, he seemed smitten with paralysis. Fearful that David would still pursue his purpose of revenge, he was filled with horror, and sank down in a condition of helpless insensibility. After ten days he died. The life that God had given him had been only a curse to the world. In the midst of his rejoicing and making merry, God had said to him, as He said to the rich man of the parable, “This night thy soul shall be required of thee.” Luke 12:20. { PP 667.4} 

 

  After my severe illness one year ago, many things which the Lord had presented to me seemed lost to my mind, but they have since been repeated. I know that which I now speak will bring me into conflict. This I do not covet, for the conflict has seemed to be continuous of late years; but I do not mean to live a coward or die a coward, leaving my work undone. I must follow in my Master’s footsteps. It has become fashionable to look down upon the poor, and upon the colored race in particular. But Jesus, the Master, was poor, and He sympathizes with the poor, the discarded, the oppressed, and declares that every insult shown to them is as if shown to Himself. I am more and more surprised as I see those who claim to be children of God possessing so little of the sympathy, tenderness, and love which actuated Christ. Would that every church, north and south, were imbued with the spirit of our Lord’s teaching. { SW 10.4 } 

 

But His godly principles roused their anger. Often for refusing to join in some forbidden act, He was called a coward. Often He was sneered at, as being altogether too particular about little things. To all this His answer was: “It is written.” “The fear of the Lord, that is wisdom; and to depart from evil is understanding.” Job 28:28. To love evil is to love death, for “the wages of sin is death.” Romans 6:23. { SJ 39.3} 

 

  If Brother G had received the light that the Lord sent him months ago and had frankly conversed with his wife, if both had broken their hard hearts before the Lord, how different would be their present state. They both slighted the words of reproof and entreaty of the Spirit of God, and did not reform their lives. But closing their eyes to the light God had sent them did not make one of their faults less grievous in the sight of God nor lessen their accountability. They have hated the reproof which the Lord in pitying tenderness gave them. Brother G has naturally a kind and tender heart, but it is crusted over with self-love, vanity, and evil surmising. His heart is not callous, but he lacks moral power. He is a coward as soon as the necessity of self-denial and self-sacrifice is brought before him, for he loves himself. To control self, to put a watch upon his words, to acknowledge that he has done wrong or spoken wrongly, is a cross which he feels is too humiliating to lift; and yet if he is ever saved this cross must be lifted. { 4T 242.2} 

 

Jesus had said many things concerning the hour of trial that was to come upon his disciples when he should be made the object of mockery and reproach. He had told them, “All ye shall be offended because of me.” But the disciples could not believe that they would manifest such unfaithfulness, and Peter especially had assured the Master that he would never leave him, but would be true to him even if it should lead him to prison and to death. When Jesus was actually in the hands of the armed men, where were the boastful disciples?—They had fled. Even Peter was in the rear, far from his suffering Lord. When the cruel trial began in the judgment hall, had Jesus a defender in the ardent Peter? Was he then by the side of his deserted Lord?—No, but with those who were mocking and reviling. It is true that Peter had a deep interest in the trial, and he did desire to be at the side of his Lord; but he could not endure the scorn, the reproach, that would fall upon him if he should take his place as a disciple of Christ. When one of the women of the palace said to Peter, “Thou also wast with Jesus of Galilee,” he denied before all the company, saying, “I know not what thou sayest.” He who had made so confident a statement of his fidelity to Christ, now denied his Lord at the question of a maid in the palace. Did he now move nearer to his Lord?—No, he pushed his way out to the porch, seeking to escape the prying eyes of the enemies of his Lord; but again he was recognized, and another said to him, “This fellow was also with Jesus of Nazareth.” And again he denied with an oath, “I do not know the man.” Peter was irritated that he could not find an escape from the eyes of his enemies; he returned again to the hall, where he could better view the trial, but he stood among the mockers and revilers of Christ, and the third time he was recognized, and they said to him, “Surely thou also art one of them; for thy speech betrayeth thee.” Peter had been ready to take up arms in defense of Christ, but to acknowledge the Lord when he was the object of scorn and derision, was more than he had courage to do. He was a moral coward, and with curses and oaths he denied that he knew his Master. { RH April 7, 1891, par. 7 }

 

  The influence of the world did not prevail with Peter. He was converted, and after the resurrection of Christ, he was endowed with the Holy Spirit, and then with boldness charged the rulers with their guilt in putting Christ to death. He said, “Ye denied the Holy One and the Just, and desired a murderer to be granted unto you; and killed the Prince of life.” After his conversion, Peter showed that he was an entirely changed man. He was not the self-confident, boasting Peter that he had been before his conversion. And when the enemies of Christ threatened him, and charged him that he should not teach any more in the name of Jesus, and bring this man’s blood upon them, their threatening did not intimidate the servant of Christ. He did not turn coward, but with the other apostles proclaimed the name of Christ until they were all shut up in prison. But the angel of the Lord by night opened the prison doors, and brought them forth, and said, “Go, stand and speak in the temple to the people all the words of this life.” The command of the angel was opposed to the command of the authorities, and which should they obey? “Then Peter and the other apostles answered and said, We ought to obey God rather than men. The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom ye slew and hanged on a tree. Him hath God exalted with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel, and forgiveness of sins. And we are his witnesses of these things; and so is also the Holy Ghost, whom God hath given to them that obey him. When they heard that, they were cut to the heart, and took counsel to slay them. Then stood there up one in the council, a Pharisee, named Gamaliel, a doctor of the law, had in reputation among all the people, and commanded to put the apostles forth a little space; and said unto them, ... Refrain from these men, and let them alone; for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to naught; but if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.” { RH February 26, 1895, par. 7 }

 

  When Jesus was actually in the hands of the armed men, where were the boastful disciples?—They had fled. Even Peter was in the rear, far from his suffering Lord. When the cruel trial began in the judgment-hall, had Jesus a defender in the ardent Peter? Was he then by the side of his deserted Lord?—No, but with those who were mocking and reviling. It is true that Peter had a deep interest in the trial, and he did desire to be at the side of his Lord; but he could not endure the scorn, the reproach, that would fall upon him if he should take his place as a disciple of Christ. When one of the women of the palace said to Peter, “Thou also wast with Jesus of Galilee,” he denied before all the company, saying, “I know not what thou sayest.” He who had made so confident a statement of his fidelity to Christ, now denied his Lord at the question of a maid in the palace. Did he now move nearer to his Lord?—No; he pushed his way out to the porch, seeking to escape the prying eyes of the enemies of his Lord; but again he was recognized, and another said to him, “This fellow was also with Jesus of Nazareth.” And again he denied with an oath, “I do not know the man.” Peter was irritated that he could not find an escape from the eyes of his enemies, and he returned to the hall, where he could better view the trial, but he stood among the mockers and revilers of Christ. The third time he was recognized, and they said to him, “Surely thou also art one of them; for thy speech betrayeth thee.” Peter had been ready to take up arms in defense of Christ, but to acknowledge the Lord when he was the object of scorn and derision was more than he had courage to do. He was a moral coward, and with curses and oaths he denied that he knew his Master. { RH February 6, 1913, par. 8 }

 

  Here is a lesson to all who have reasoning powers, that harsh treatment, even to the brutes, is offensive to God. Those who profess to love God do not always consider that abuse to animals, or suffering brought upon them by neglect, is a sin. The fruits of divine grace will be as truly revealed in men by the manner in which they treat their beasts, as by their service in the house of God. Those who allow themselves to become impatient or enraged with their animals are not Christians. A man who is harsh, severe and domineering toward the lower animals, because he has them in his power, is both a coward and a tyrant. And he will, if opportunity offers, manifest the same cruel, overbearing spirit toward his wife and children. { ST November 25, 1880, par. 18 }

 

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EGW Quotes-C-D Calamity (Scenes of Calamity) Calvary (Scenes of Calvary) Cancel (to make of no effect) Candles (Golden Candlesticks) Cause (Without cause) Caution (be very cautious) Character (Separate Page) Choose the right Christ (Separate page) Christian (Separate page) Church (Separate page) Cities (leave the cities) Civil authorities cleanse the camp Close their eyes to Coldness by those Collision Comforter Communicate (Willing to Communicate) Communion ( Communion with ) Communion Service Compassion (Full of compassion) Compliance (strict compliance) Complications Comprehension (Separate page) Compromise with sin Confession Confidence (Separate page) Conflict (In the final conflict) Conform to worldly customs Confusion Conscience (Separate page) Consecrated to God Consequences Contaminated Control over minds Conversion (True Conversion) Conviction (Separate page) Correction Counsel of peace Counterfeit Courage (Lose courage) Courtesy (Separate page) Courts (Appeal to courts) Covenant (Everlasting Covenant) Covetousness Creation (Separate page) Creed Crisis (Last crisis) Criticism Crown of glory Crucifixion Darkness (Separate page) Day of Atonement Deception (Separate page) Desire (Separate page) Disasters (Separate page) Discipline (Separate page) Divine (Separate page) Doctrines (Separate page) Duty (Separate page) Ten Commandments (Separate page) Cowardice (109)