Liability of . . .

   Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                l i a b i l i t y    o f  .  .  .       (  3  RELATED  PHRASES )                       

                      The  phrase  'Liability of . . .'  appears  16  times in the published writings of EGW                                    See page on Original site                                                               Related Phrase:   increasing the Liability of   (below ) - -  Liabilities of church organizations ( ) 

We have evidence in God's word of the liability of His people to be greatly deceived. There are many instances where what may seem to be a sincere zeal for the honor of God has its origin in leaving the soul unguarded for the enemy to tempt and to impress the mind with a perverted sense of the real state of things. And we may expect just such things in these last days, for Satan is just as busy now as he was in the congregation of Israel. The cruelty and strength of prejudice are not understood. After the congregation had the evidence before their sight of the destruction of these leaders in rebellion, the power of suspicion and distrust which had been let into their souls was not removed. They saw the ground open and the leaders of rebellion go down into the bowels of the earth. This fearful exhibition surely ought to have cured them and led them to the deepest repentance for their abuse of Moses.  {3T 353.2}

 

 
Our danger does not arise from the opposition of the world, but it is found in the liability of our being in friendship with the world and imitating the example of those who love not God or His truth. The loss of earthly things for the truth's sake, the suffering of great inconvenience for loyalty to principle, does not place us in danger of losing our faith and hope; but we are in danger of suffering loss because of being deceived and overcome by the temptations of Satan. Trials will work for our good if we receive and bear them without murmuring, and will tend to separate us from the love of the world and will lead us to trust more fully in God. {TMK 269.3} - { CTr 203.3} - {RH, February 5, 1895 par. 3}

 

But here we must not become in our ideas common and earthly, and in our perverted ideas we must not think that the liability of Christ to yield to Satan's temptations degraded His humanity and He possessed the same sinful, corrupt propensities as man.  {16MR 182.2}
 
  Every precaution should be taken for the preservation of health. The tents should be securely staked. It is now customary to supply tents with a raised floor, which may be covered with a carpet, and made very neat and comfortable. This is an excellent plan, and should be followed wherever circumstances admit. When the meeting is held in a country where there is liability of rains, a trench should be dug around the tent to carry off the water. This should not be neglected, even though there has been no rain for weeks. Lives have been imperiled, and even lost, through neglect of this precaution. People in new countries sometimes become careless; but it should be the principle of all Christians to correct a tendency to slack, indolent habits. In many cases it is advisable that families provide stoves for their tents. { GosHealth April 1, 1898, par. 4 }
 
We received your letter last evening. We also received one from James. Lucinda, I have no idea now of exchanging a certainty for an uncertainty. I can write more, and am free. Should I come east, James' happiness might suddenly change to complaining and fretting.I am thoroughly disgusted with this state of things, and do not mean to place myself where there is the least liability of its occurring. The more I think of the matter the more settled and determined I am, unless God gives me light, to remain where I am. I can never have an opportunity such as God has favored me with at the present. I must work as God should direct. I plead and entreat for light. If it is my duty to attend the camp meetings, I shall know it. {DG 266.8

 

If attendants are awake to the subject of health, and realize the necessity of ventilation for their own benefit, as well as that of the patient, and the relatives, as well as the sick, oppose the admission of air and light into the sick-room, the attendants should have no scruples of conscience in leaving the sick-room. They should feel themselves released from their obligations to the sick. It is not the duty of one or more to risk the liability of incurring disease and endangering their lives by breathing the poisonous atmosphere. If the sick will fall victims to their own erroneous ideas, and will shut out of the room the most essential of heaven's blessings, let them do so, but not at the peril of those who ought to live.-- H. to L., Chap. 4, p. 57.  {HL 250.2} {2SM 457.3}
 
If attendants are awake to the subject of health, and realize the necessity of ventilation for their own benefit as well as for the benefit of the patient, and the relatives as well as the sick oppose the admission of air and light into the sick-room, the attendants should have no scruples of conscience in leaving the sick-room. They should feel themselves released from their obligations to the sick. It is not the duty of one or more to risk the liability of incurring disease, thus endangering their lives, by breathing a poisonous atmosphere. If the sick will fall a victim to his own erroneous ideas, and will shut out of the room the most essential of heaven's blessings, let him do so, but not at the peril of those who ought to live.  {RH, December 5, 1899 par. 9}

 

The tents should be securely staked; and in a country where there is liability of rains, they should be trenched. If there has been no rain for weeks, this should be no excuse for want of thoroughness in this matter. Lives have been imperiled, and even lost, through neglect of this precaution. People in new countries sometimes become careless; but it should be one of the principles of our faith to correct this tendency to slack, indolent habits.  {RH, April 22, 1884 par. 8}
The tents should be securely staked, and whenever there is liability of rain, every tent should be trenched. On no account let this be neglected. Serious and even fatal illness has been contracted through neglect of this precaution.  {PH130 5.2}  and  { 6T 35.1} 

 

                                                               increasing  the  liability  of                                                                       

 

Upon rising in the morning, most persons would be benefited by taking a sponge or hand bath. This will remove all impurities from the skin, and keep it moist and supple, thereby aiding the circulation. Persons in health should on no account neglect frequent bathing. Whether a person is sick or well, respiration is rendered more free and full by bathing. The mind and body are alike invigorated. The muscles become more flexible, every faculty of the intellect is made brighter. The bath is a soother of the nerves. Instead of increasing the liability of  taking cold, it fortifies against cold, because it improves the circulation; the blood is brought to the surface, and a more easy and regular flow of the vital fluid is obtained.  {CTBH 107.1}

 

 
Persons in health should on no account neglect bathing. They should by all means bathe as often as twice a week. Those who are not in health have impurities in the blood, and the skin is not in a healthy condition. The multitude of pores, or little mouths, through which the body breathes, become clogged and filled with waste matter. The skin needs to be carefully and thoroughly cleansed, that the pores may do their work in freeing the body from impurities; therefore feeble persons who are diseased surely need the advantages and blessings of bathing as often as twice a week, and frequently even more than this is positively necessary. Whether a person is sick or well, respiration is more free and easy if bathing is practiced. By it, the muscles become more flexible, the mind and body are alike invigorated, the intellect is made brighter, and every faculty becomes livelier. The bath is a soother of the nerves. It promotes general perspiration, quickens the circulation, overcomes obstructions in the system, and acts beneficially on the kidneys and urinary organs. Bathing helps the bowels, stomach, and liver, giving energy and new life to each. It also promotes digestion, and instead of the system being weakened, it is strengthened. Instead of increasing the liability of cold, a bath, properly taken, fortifies against cold, because the circulation is improved, and the uterine organs, which are more or less congested are relieved; for the blood is brought to the surface, and a more easy and regular flow of the blood through all the blood vessels is obtained.-- Testimonies for the Church, vol. 3, pp. 70, 71 (1871).  {CH 104.1}

 

 

 

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