Days of Jeremiah

   Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

             d a y s    o f    j e r e m i a h                   (  3  RELATED  PHRASES )      

                       The  phrase  'days of Jeremiah'  appears  13  times in the published writings of EGW           See page on Original site                                                          Related Phrases:    time of Jeremiah (  )       also  PK, Chapter 34 about Jeremiah

 The sin of Eli had consisted in passing lightly over the iniquity of his sons in sacred office, and over the evils prevailing throughout the land. His neglect to correct these evils had brought upon Israel a fearful calamity. His sons had fallen in battle, Eli himself had lost his life, the ark of God had been taken from the land of Israel, thirty thousand of the people had been slain—and all because sin had been allowed to flourish unrebuked and unchecked. Israel had vainly thought that, notwithstanding their sinful practices, the presence of the ark would ensure them victory over the Philistines. In like manner, during the days of Jeremiah, the inhabitants of Judah were prone to believe that a strict observance of the divinely appointed services of the temple would preserve them from a just punishment for their wicked course.  { PK 416.1} 
  What a lesson is this to men holding positions of responsibility today in the church of God!  What a solemn warning to deal faithfully with wrongs that bring dishonor to the cause of truth! Let none who claim to be the depositaries of God’s law flatter themselves that the regard they may outwardly show toward the commandments will preserve them from the exercise of divine justice. Let none refuse to be reproved for evil, nor charge the servants of God with being too zealous in endeavoring to cleanse the camp from evil-doing.  A sin-hating God calls upon those who claim to keep His law to depart from all iniquity. A neglect to repent and to render willing obedience will bring upon men and women today as serious consequences as came upon ancient Israel. There is a limit beyond which the judgments of Jehovah can no longer be delayed. The desolation of Jerusalem in the days of Jeremiah is a solemn warning to modern Israel, that the counsels and admonitions given them through chosen instrumentalities cannot be disregarded with impunity.  Prophets and Kings, page 416.2  Read entire chapter 34

 

 
In these days He has instituted no new plan to preserve the purity of His people. As of old, He entreats the erring ones who profess His name to repent and turn from their evil ways. Now, as then, by the mouth of His chosen servants He predicts the dangers before them. He sounds the note of warning and reproves sin just as faithfully as in the days of Jeremiah.  But the Israel of our time have the same temptations to scorn reproof and hate counsel as had ancient Israel. They too often turn a deaf ear to the words that God has given His servants for the benefit of those who profess the truth. Though the Lord in mercy withholds for a time the retribution of their sin, as in the days of JeremiahHe will not always stay His hand, but will visit iniquity with righteous judgment. { 4T 165.1}  { RH June 30, 1885, par. 14 }

 

In these days He has instituted no new plan to preserve the purity of His people. He entreats the erring ones who profess His name to repent and turn from their evil ways, in the same manner that He did of old. He predicts the dangers before them by the mouth of His chosen servants now as then. He sounds His note of warning, and reproves sin just as faithfully as in the days of Jeremiah. But the Israel of our time have the same temptations to scorn reproof and hate counsel as did ancient Israel. They too often turn a deaf ear to the words that God has given His servants for the benefit of those who profess the truth.—The Signs of the Times, February 12, 1880, par. 3. { YRP 268.4} 
 
In these days he has instituted no new plan to preserve the purity of his people. He entreats the erring ones who profess his name, to repent and turn from their evil ways, in the same manner that he did of old. He predicts the dangers before them, by the mouth of his chosen servants now as then. He sounds his note of warning, and reproves sin just as faithfully as in the days of Jeremiah. But the Israel of our time have the same temptations to scorn reproof and hate counsel, as did ancient Israel. They too often turn a deaf ear to the words that God has given his servants for the benefit of those who profess the truth. Though the Lord in mercy withholds for a time the retribution of their sin, as in the days of Jeremiah, he will not always stay his hand, but will visit iniquity with righteous judgment. { ST February 12, 1880,  par. 3 }

 

Those who stood in the temple court listening to Jeremiah understood clearly this reference to Shiloh, when in the days of Eli the Philistines had carried away the ark of the testament. The sin of Eli consisted in passing lightly over the evils prevailing in the land. His neglect to correct these evils had brought on Israel a fearful calamity. Eli lost his life, the ark had been taken from Israel, thirty thousand people had been slain—all because sin had flourished unrebuked and unchecked. Israel had vainly thought that, notwithstanding their sinful practices, the ark would ensure victory over the Philistines. In like manner, during the days of Jeremiah, the people of Judah were prone to believe that observance of the appointed temple services would preserve them from punishment for their wicked course. { SS 216.3 } 
 
What a lesson is this to men holding positions of responsibility in the church! What a warning to deal faithfully with wrongs that bring dishonor to the cause of truth! Let none charge the servants of God with being too zealous in endeavoring to cleanse the camp from evil-doing. The desolation of Jerusalem in the days of Jeremiah is a solemn warning that the admonitions given through chosen instrumentalities cannot be disregarded with impunity. { SS 216.4 } 

 

Those who stood in the temple court listening to Jeremiah clearly understood this reference to Shiloh, when in Eli’s days the Philistines had carried away the ark of the covenant. Eli’s sin consisted in treating lightly the evils prevailing in the land. His neglect to correct these evils had brought a fearful disaster on Israel. Eli lost his life, the ark had been taken from Israel, thirty thousand people had been killed—all because sin had flourished unrebuked and unrestrained. Israel had foolishly thought that, despite their sinful practices, the ark would ensure victory over the Philistines. Likewise, during the days of Jeremiah, the people of Judah tended to believe that performing the appointed temple services would preserve them from punishment for their wicked course. { RR 147.7 } 

What a lesson this is to people holding positions of responsibility in the church! What a warning to deal faithfully with wrongs that bring dishonor to the cause of truth! Let no one accuse the servants of God of being too zealous in trying to cleanse the camp from evil-doing. Jerusalem’s desolation in the days of Jeremiah is a solemn warning that we cannot disregard the counsels given through God’s chosen instruments and expect no consequences to follow. { RR 148.1 } 

 
 

 

                                                                days  of  Jeremiah's  ministry                                                                  
 
  It was their conscientious observance of the commands of Holy Scripture, that in the days of Jeremiah’s ministry brought to Daniel and his fellows opportunities to exalt the true God before the nations of earth. The instruction these Hebrew children had received in the homes of their parents, made them strong in faith and constant in their service of the living God, the Creator of the heavens and the earth. When, early in the reign of Jehoiakim, Nebuchadnezzar for the first time besieged and captured Jerusalem, and carried away Daniel and his companions, with others specially chosen for service in the court of Babylon, the faith of the Hebrew captives was tried to the utmost. But those who had learned to place their trust in the promises of God found these all-sufficient in every experience through which they were called to pass during their sojourn in a strange land. The Scriptures proved to them a guide and a stay. { PK 428.1}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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