Chapter 18 - Healing of the Waters

          H e a l i n g   of   the    w a t e r s                  

                          CHAPTER  18:         H E A L I N G    O  F   t h e    w a t e r s           PAGES  229   TO  234                                 

                                                 This chapter is bases on  2 Kings 2  

 

    In Patriarchal times the Jordan Valley was “well watered everywhere, ... even as the garden of the Lord.” It was in this fair valley that Lot chose to make his home when he “pitched his tent toward Sodom.” Genesis 13:10, 12. At the time that the cities of the plain were destroyed, the region round about became a desolate waste, and it has since formed a part of the wilderness of Judea. { PK 229.1} 

A portion of the beautiful valley remained, with its life-giving springs and streams, to gladden the heart of man. In this valley, rich with fields of grain and forests of date palms and other fruit-bearing trees, the hosts of Israel had encamped after crossing the Jordan and had first partaken of the fruits of the Promised Land. Before them had stood the walls of Jericho, a heathen stronghold, the center of the worship of Ashtoreth, vilest and most degrading of all Canaanitish forms of idolatry. Soon its walls were thrown down and its inhabitants slain, and at the time of its fall the solemn declaration was made, in the presence of all Israel: “Cursed be the man before the Lord, that riseth up and buildeth this city Jericho: he shall lay the foundation thereof in his first-born, and in his youngest son shall he set up the gates of it.” Joshua 6:26. { PK 229.2} 

Five centuries passed. The spot lay desolate, accursed of God. Even the springs that had made residence in this portion of the valley so desirable suffered the blighting effects of the curse. But in the days of Ahab’s apostasy, when through Jezebel’s influence the worship of Ashtoreth was revived, Jericho, the ancient seat of this worship, was rebuilt, though at a fearful cost to the builder. Hiel the Bethelite “laid the foundation thereof in Abiram his first-born, and set up the gates thereof in his youngest son Segub, according to the word of the Lord.” 1 Kings 16:34. { PK 230.1} 

 

Not far from Jericho, in the midst of fruitful groves, was one of the schools of the prophets, and thither, after the ascension of Elijah, Elisha went. During his sojourn among them the men of the city came to the prophet and said, “Behold, I pray thee, the situation of this city is pleasant, as my lord seeth: but the water is nought, and the ground barren.” The spring that in former years had been pure and life-giving, and had contributed largely to the water supply of the city and the surrounding district, was now unfit for use. { PK 230.2}

In response to the plea of the men of Jericho, Elisha said, “Bring me a new cruse, and put salt therein.” Having received this, “he went forth unto the spring of the waters, and cast the salt in there, and said, Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more death or barren land.” 2 Kings 2:19-21. { PK 230.3}

The healing of the waters of Jericho was accomplished, not by any wisdom of man, but by the miraculous interposition of God. Those who had rebuilt the city were undeserving of the favor of Heaven; yet He who “maketh His sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust,” saw fit in this instance to reveal, through this token of compassion, His willingness to heal Israel of their spiritual maladies. Matthew 5:45. { PK 231.1} 

The restoration was permanent; “the waters were healed unto this day, according to the saying of Elisha which he spake.” 2 Kings 2:22. From age to age the waters have flowed on, making that portion of the valley an oasis of beauty. { PK 231.2} 

Many are the spiritual lessons to be gathered from the story of the healing of the waters. The new cruse, the salt, the spring—all are highly symbolic. { PK 231.3} 

In casting salt into the bitter spring, Elisha taught the same spiritual lesson imparted centuries later by the Saviour to His disciples when He declared, “Ye are the salt of the earth.” Matthew 5:13. The salt mingling with the polluted spring purified its waters and brought life and blessing where before had been blighting and death. When God compares His children to salt, He would teach them that His purpose in making them the subjects of His grace is that they may become agents in saving others. The object of God in choosing a people before all the world was not only that He might adopt them as His sons and daughters, but that through them the world might receive the grace that bringeth salvation. When the Lord chose Abraham, it was not simply to be the special friend of God, but to be a medium of the peculiar privileges the Lord desired to bestow upon the nations. { PK 231.4} 

 

The world needs evidences of sincere Christianity. The poison of sin is at work at the heart of society. Cities and towns are steeped in sin and moral corruption. The world is full of sickness, suffering, and iniquity. Nigh and afar off are souls in poverty and distress, weighed down with a sense of guilt and perishing for want of a saving influence. The gospel of truth is kept ever before them, yet they perish because the example of those who should be a savor of life to them is a savor of death. Their souls drink in bitterness because the springs are poisoned, when they should be like a well of water springing up unto everlasting life. { PK 232.1} 

Salt must be mingled with the substance to which it is added; it must penetrate, infuse it, that it may be preserved. So it is through personal contact and association that men are reached by the saving power of the gospel. They are not saved as masses, but as individuals. Personal influence is a power. It is to work with the influence of Christ, to lift where Christ lifts, to impart correct principles, and to stay the progress of the world’s corruption. It is to diffuse that grace which Christ alone can impart. It is to uplift, to sweeten the lives and characters of others by the power of a pure example united with earnest faith and love. { PK 232.2} 

 

Of the hitherto polluted spring at Jericho, the Lord declared, “I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more death or barren land.” The polluted stream represents the soul that is separate from God. Sin not only shuts away from God, but destroys in the human soul both the desire and the capacity for knowing Him. Through sin, the whole human organism is deranged, the mind is perverted, the imagination corrupted; the faculties of the soul are degraded. There is an absence of pure religion, of heart holiness. The converting power of God has not wrought in transforming the character. The soul is weak, and for want of moral force to overcome, is polluted and debased. { PK 233.1} 

To the heart that has become purified, all is changed. Transformation of character is the testimony to the world of an indwelling Christ. The Spirit of God produces a new life in the soul, bringing the thoughts and desires into obedience to the will of Christ; and the inward man is renewed in the image of God. Weak and erring men and women show to the world that the redeeming power of grace can cause the faulty character to develop into symmetry and abundant fruitfulness. { PK 233.2} 

The heart that receives the word of God is not as a pool that evaporates, not like a broken cistern that loses its treasure. It is like the mountain stream, fed by unfailing springs, whose cool, sparkling waters leap from rock to rock, refreshing the weary, the thirsty, the heavy-laden. It is like a river constantly flowing and, as it advances, becoming deeper and wider, until its life-giving waters are spread over all the earth. The stream that goes singing on its way leaves behind its gift of verdure and fruitfulness. The grass on its banks is a fresher green, the trees have a richer verdure, the flowers are more abundant. When the earth lies bare and brown under the summer’s scorching heat, a line of verdure marks the river’s course. { PK 233.3} 

So it is with the true child of God. The religion of Christ reveals itself as a vitalizing, pervading principle, a living, working, spiritual energy. When the heart is opened to the heavenly influence of truth and love, these principles will flow forth again like streams in the desert, causing fruitfulness to appear where now are barrenness and dearth. { PK 234.1} 

As those who have been cleansed and sanctified through a knowledge of Bible truth engage heartily in the work of soulsaving, they will become indeed a savor of life unto life. And as daily they drink of the inexhaustible fountain of grace and knowledge, they will find that their own hearts are filled to overflowing with the Spirit of their Master, and that through their unselfish ministry many are benefited physically, mentally, and spiritually. The weary are refreshed, the sick restored to health, and the sin-burdened relieved. In far-off countries thanksgiving is heard from the lips of those whose hearts are turned from the service of sin unto righteousness. { PK 234.2} 

“Give, and it shall be given unto you;” Luke 6:38;  for the word of God is “a fountain of gardens, a well of living waters, and streams from Lebanon.”  Song of Solomon 4:15. { PK 234.3} 

       Continue to Chapter 19 — A Prophet of Peace

 

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Related Information

Prophets and Kings Chapter 38: Light through Darkness Chapter 40: Nebuchadnezzar's Dream Chapter 42: True Greatness Chapter 51 - Spiritual Revival Chapter 52 - A Man of Opportunity Chapter 53 - The Builders on the Wall Chapter 1 - Solomon Chapter 10 - Voice of Strong Rebuke Chapter 11 - Carmel Chapter 12 - From Jezreel to Horeb Chapter 13 - What Doest Thou Here Chapter 14 - In the Spirit of Elias Chapter 15 - Jehoshaphat Chapter 16 - Fall of the House of Ahab Chapter 17 - Call of Elisha Chapter 19 - Prophet of Peace Chapter 2 - Temple and its Dedication Chapter 20 - Naaman Chapter 21 - Elisha's Closing Ministry Chapter 22 - Nineveh Chapter 23 - The Assyrian Captivity Chapter 24 - Destroyed for Lack of Knowledge Chapter 25 - The Call of Isaiah . Chapter 26 - Behold your God Chapter 27 - Ahaz Chapter 28 - Hezekiah Chapter 29 - Ambassadors from Babylon Chapter 3 - Pride of Prosperity Chapter 30 - Deliverance from Assyria Chapter 31 - Hope for the Heathen Chapter 32 - Manasseh and Josiah Chapter 33 - Book of the Law Chapter 34 - Jeremiah Chapter 35: Approaching Doom Chapter 36 - The Last King of Judah Chapter 37: Carried Captive Into Babylon Chapter 39: In the Court of Babylon Chapter 4 - Results of Transgression Chapter 41: The Fiery Furnace Chapter 43 - Unseen Watcher Chapter 44: In the Lion's Den Chapter 45: Return of the Exiles Chapter 46: The Prophets of God Helping Them Chapter 47: Joshua and the Angel Chapter 48 - Not by Might nor by Power Chapter 49 - In the Days of Queen Esther Chapter 5 - Solomon's Repentance Chapter 50 - Ezra, the Priest and Scribe Chapter 54 — A Rebuke Against Extortion Chapter 55: Heathen Plots Chapter 56-Instructed in Law of God Chapter 57 - Reformation Chapter 6 - Rending of the Kingdom Chapter 7 - Jeroboam Chapter 8 - National Apostasy Chapter 9 - Elijah Introduction - Vineyard of the Lord