Grievous Sin (65)

   Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                G r i e v o u s     S I N            (  4  RELATED  PHRASES )                      

                       The  phrase  'grievous sin'  appears  65  times in the published writings of EGW                                     See page on Original site                                                                                           Related Phrase:     grievous sin in the sight of God  ( below )   - -   grievous sin of . . .  ( 11 )

   The prophet's rebuke touched the heart of David;  conscience was aroused;  his guilt appeared in all its enormity.  His soul was bowed in penitence before God.  With trembling lips he said, "I have sinned against the Lord." All wrong done to others reaches back from the injured one to God.  David had committed a grievous sin, toward both Uriah and Bathsheba, and he keenly felt this. But infinitely greater was his sin against God.  {Patriarchs and Prophets, 722.1}   Read Chapter 71

 

 
  The only satisfaction Satan takes in playing the game of life for the souls of men is the satisfaction he takes in hurting the heart of Christ. Though He was rich, for our sake Christ became poor, that we through His poverty might be made rich. Yet in view of this great fact, the majority of the world permit earthly possessions to eclipse heavenly attractions. They set their affections upon earthly things, and turn away from God.  What a grievous sin it is that men will not come to their senses, and understand how foolish it is to permit inordinate affections for earthly things to expel the love of God from the heart. When the love of God is expelled, the love of the world quickly flows in to supply the vacuum. The Lord alone can cleanse the soul temple from the moral defilement.  {CS 136.2}

 

  After His baptism the Son of God entered the dreary wilderness, there to be tempted by the devil. For nearly six weeks He endured the agonies of hunger. . . . He realized the power of appetite upon man; and in behalf of sinful man, He bore the closest test possible upon that point. Here a victory was gained which few can appreciate. The controlling power of depraved appetite and the grievous sin of indulging it can only be understood by the length of the fast which our Saviour endured that He might break its power. . . .  {HP 194.2}

 

  All heaven beholds with indignation human beings, the workmanship of God, reduced by their fellow men to the lowest depths of degradation and placed on a level with the brute creation. Professed followers of that dear Saviour whose compassion was ever moved at the sight of human woe, heartily engage in this enormous and grievous sin, and deal in slaves and souls of men. Human agony is carried from place to place and bought and sold. Angels have recorded it all; it is written in the book. The tears of the pious bondmen and bondwomen, of fathers, mothers, and children, brothers and sisters, are all bottled up in heaven. God will restrain His anger but little longer. His wrath burns against this nation and especially against the religious bodies that have sanctioned this terrible traffic and have themselves engaged in it. Such injustice, such oppression, such sufferings, are looked upon with heartless indifference by many professed followers of the meek and lowly Jesus. And many of them can themselves inflict, with hateful satisfaction, all this indescribable agony; and yet they dare to worship God. It is solemn mockery; Satan exults over it and reproaches Jesus and His angels with such inconsistency, saying, with hellish triumph, “Such are Christ’s followers!” { EW 275.1} 
 
  The season of temptation, under which, it may be, one falls into grievous sin, does not create the evil that is revealed but only develops or makes manifest that which was hidden and latent in the heart. As a man "thinketh in his heart, so is he"; for out of the heart "are the issues of life" (Proverbs 23:7; 4:23).-- MB 60 (1896).  {2MCP 657.4}
 
  It is carrying that which is lawful to excess that makes it a grievous sin.   {AH 122.3}   {4T 505}   {TSB 115.1}

 

  The school faculty held private consultations to consider what was best to be done. There was a voice in these counsels that tried to counterwork the plans introduced to keep discipline and order. By this sympathizing voice indiscreet words were dropped to the students in reference to the matters under consideration in the council. These things were caught up by the students. They thought that such a teacher was all right; that she was a clever teacher. She would have sympathy for the wrongdoer. Thus the hands of those carrying a heavy load were not strengthened, but weakened. The efforts made to repress evil were looked upon as harsh and uncharitable. "Young folks must have their jolly times," was repeated, with other insipid speeches. A word dropped here and a word there left its baneful impression; and the wrong-doers knew that there were those in the school who did not think that their course of deception and falsehood was a great sin. But to continually take up the cause of the wrongdoer, making of no account his departure from righteousness and truth and steadfast integrity, is a grievous sin against God.  {FE 454.2}
 
After His baptism, the Son of God entered the dreary wilderness, there to be tempted by the devil. . . . For forty days He ate and drank nothing. . . . He realized the power of appetite upon man; and in behalf of sinful man, He bore the closest test possible upon that point. Here a victory was gained which few can appreciate. The controlling power of depraved appetite, and the grievous sin of indulging it, can only be understood by the length of the fast which our Saviour endured that He might break its power. . . . He came to earth to unite His divine power with our human efforts, that through the strength and moral power which He imparts, we might overcome in our own behalf.  {AG 164.2}  and  { OFC 157.2} 

 

It is hardly possible for men to offer greater insult to God than to despise and reject the instrumentalities He would use for their salvation. The Israelites had not only done this, but had purposed to put both Moses and Aaron to death. Yet they did not realize the necessity of seeking pardon of God for their grievous sin.  That night of probation was not passed in repentance and confession, but in devising some way to resist the evidences which showed them to be the greatest of sinners. They still cherished hatred of the men of God's appointment, and braced themselves to resist their authority. Satan was at hand to pervert their judgment and lead them blindfold to destruction.  {PP 402.1}
 
Does God condemn Moses? No, no; the great goodness of God pardons the rashness and zeal of Moses, because it was all on account of his fidelity and his disappointment and grief at the sight of his eyes in the evidence of Israel's apostasy. The man who might have saved the Hebrews in the hour of their peril is calm. He does not show indignation because of the sins of the people, neither does he reproach himself and manifest remorse under the sense of his wrongs; but he seeks to justify his course in a grievous sin. He makes the people accountable for his weakness in yielding to their request. He was unwilling to bear the murmuring of Israel and to stand under the pressure of their clamors and unreasonable wishes, as Moses had done. He entered into the spirit and feelings of the people without remonstrance, and then sought to make them responsible.  {3T 341.2}

 

Other false prophets arose to sow confusion among the people by turning them away from obeying the divine commands given through Jeremiah, but God's judgments were pronounced against them in consequence of their grievous sin of bringing rebellion against Him.  {4T 173.3}
 
It is hardly possible for men to offer greater insult to God than to despise and reject the instrumentalities he would use for their salvation. The Israelites had not only done this, but had purposed to put both Moses and Aaron to death. Yet they did not realize the necessity of seeking pardon of God for their grievous sin. The night of probation was not passed in repentance and confession, but in devising some way to resist the evidences which showed them to be the greatest of sinners. They still cherished hatred of the men of God's appointment, and braced themselves to resist their authority. Satan was at hand to pervert their judgment, and lead them blindfold to destruction.  {RH, November 12, 1903 par. 28}
 
  The apostle adjured the Corinthians,  “Let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.”  Should they become boastful and self-confident, neglecting to watch and pray, they would fall into grievous sin, calling down upon themselves the wrath of God. Yet Paul would not have them yield to despondency or discouragement. He gave them the assurance: “God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way of escape, that ye may be able to bear it.”  { AA 316.1} 
 
Sabbath-keepers who profess to be God’s chosen, peculiar people, should discard hoops, and their practice and example should be a living rebuke to those who wear them. Some may plead convenience. I have traveled much, and have seen a great deal of inconvenience attending the wearing of hoops; and those who plead the necessity on account of health, wear them in the winter, which is a greater injury than quilted skirts. While traveling in the cars and stages, I have often been led to exclaim, Oh, modesty, where is thy blush! I have seen large companies crowding into the cars, and in order to make any headway, the hoops had to be raised and placed into a shape which was indecent. And the exposure of the form was ten-fold more with those who wore hoops, than with those who did not; and were it not for fashion, those who immodestly expose themselves would be hissed at; but modesty and decency must be sacrificed to the god of fashion. May the Lord deliver his people from this grievous sin. God will not pity those who will be slaves to fashion. But supposing there is some little convenience in wearing hoops, does this prove that it is right to wear them? Let the fashion change and convenience would no longer be mentioned. It is the duty of every child of God to inquire, Wherein am I separate from the world? Let them suffer a little inconvenience and be on the safe side. What crosses do God’s people bear? They mingle with the world, partake of their spirit, dress, talk and act like them. { RH June 25, 1861, par. 6 }

 

 

                                   Grievous   sin   in   the   sight   of   God                                                                               

 

   I saw that ministers, as well as people, have a warfare before them to resist Satan. The professed minister of Christ is in a fearful position when serving the purposes of the tempter, by listening to his whisperings, and letting him captivate the mind and guide the thoughts. The minister's most grievous sin in the sight of God is talking about his unbelief, and drawing other minds into the same dark channel, thus suffering Satan to carry out a twofold purpose in tempting him. He unsettles the mind of the one whose course has encouraged his temptations, and then leads that one to unsettle the minds of many.  {1T 378.2}  {GW92 120.1}  {4bSG 124.2}
 

   Of all the sins that God will punish, none are more grievous in His sight than those that encourage others to do evil. God would have His servants prove their loyalty by faithfully rebuking transgression, however painful the act may be. Those who are honored with a divine commission are not to be weak, pliant time-servers. They are not to aim at self-exaltation, or to shun disagreeable duties,  but to perform God's work with unswerving fidelity.   Patriarchs and Prophets, page 323.3

 

 
  There exists in the hearts of many an element of selfishness which clings to them like the leprosy. They have so long consulted their own wishes, their own pleasure and convenience, that they do not feel that others have claims upon them. Their thoughts, plans, and efforts are for themselves. They live for self, and do not cultivate disinterested benevolence, which if exercised, would increase and strengthen until it would be their delight to live for others' good. This selfishness must be seen and overcome, for it is a grievous sin in the sight of God. They need to exercise a more special interest for humanity; and in thus doing, they would bring their souls into closer connection with Christ, and would be imbued with His Spirit, so that they would cleave to Him with so firm a tenacity that nothing could separate them from His love.  {HP 232.2}   {RH, July 13, 1886 par. 2}

 

  I have been shown some things in regard to Brother I's family which have pressed upon my mind so strongly since I have been in this place that I venture to write them out. I have been shown, Brother I, that there exists in your family an element of selfishness which clings to you like the leprosy. This selfishness must be seen and overcome, for it is a grievous sin in the sight of God.  As a family you have so long consulted your own wishes, your own pleasure and convenience, that you do not feel that others have claims upon you. Your thoughts, plans, and efforts are for yourselves. You live for self; you do not cultivate disinterested benevolence, which, if exercised, would increase and strengthen until it would be your delight to live for others' good. You would feel that you had an object in life, a purpose that would bring you returns of greater value than money. You need to have a more special interest for humanity, and in so doing you would bring your souls into closer connection with Christ and would be so imbued with His Spirit and would cleave to Him with so firm a tenacity that nothing could separate you from His love.  {3T 521.2}

 

 
  In every age men have arisen who have thought it noble to doubt the word of God. Those who think it a virtue to quibble can have plenty of room to disbelieve the inspiration and truth of God's word now. God does not compel any to believe. They can choose to rely upon the evidences he has been pleased to give, or doubt, and cavil, and perish; but those who are troubled with doubts and difficulties which they cannot solve, should not throw other weak minds into the same perplexity. In the past, some have hinted or talked their unbelief, and have passed on, little dreaming of the effect produced. The seeds of unbelief, in some instances, have taken immediate root, while in others they have lain buried quite a length of time, until the individual in whose heart the seed was sown has taken a wrong course and given place to the enemy, and the light of God has been withdrawn from him; then the seeds of infidelity which were sown so long ago have sprung up and borne fruit. Ministers as well as people have a warfare before them in resisting the devil. The individual who represents God's truth is in a sad plight when found serving the purposes of Satan by listening to his whisperings, and letting him captivate the mind and guide the thoughts. It is, furthermore, a grievous sin in the sight of God for one to talk out his unbelief, and draw other minds into the same dark channel, thus suffering Satan to carry out a twofold purpose in tempting him.  {RH, February 12, 1880 par. 12}

 

  Fraud in any business transaction is a grievous sin in God's sight; for the goods men are handling belong to Him, and must be used to the glory of His name if men would be pure and clean in His sight. The religion that carries in its hand the scant measure and the deceitful balance is an abomination in the sight of God. He who cherishes such a religion will be brought to confusion; for God is  a jealous God  (Letter 8, 1901).  {3BC 1160.5}
 

 

   

 

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