Power to do good (41)

   Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                     p o w e r    t o    d o    g o o d                         (  4  RELATED  PHRASES  )                     

                        The  phrase  'power to do good'  appears  41  times in the published writings of EGW                                      page not on Original site                                                                                     Related phrase:    power to  ( )   ( below )   - -  power to - - -   (  )

    On the other hand, if by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good. In their turn they exert the same beneficial influence over others. Thus hundreds and thousands are helped by our unconscious influence. The true follower of Christ strengthens the good purposes of all with whom he comes in contact. Before an unbelieving, sin-loving world he reveals the power of God’s grace and the perfection of His character { PK 348.3}   Read entire Chapter 29

 

 
  On the other hand, if by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good. In their turn they exert the same beneficial influence over others. Thus hundreds and thousands are helped by our unconscious influence. The true follower of Christ strengthens the good purposes of all with whom he comes in contact. Before an unbelieving, sin-loving world he reveals the power of God’s grace and the perfection of His character ( Prophets and Kings, 347, 348). { LHU 285.6}  also  { RH May 13, 1915, par. 13 }
 
   Upon the impression thus made there hang results for good or evil which no man can measure. Every impulse thus imparted is seed sown which will produce its harvest. It is a link in the long chain of human events, extending we know not whither. If by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good. In their turn they exert the same influence upon others, and they upon still others. Thus by our unconscious influence thousands may be blessed. { COL 339.4}   Read entire chapter 25
 
  It is Satan’s design so to pervert every function of our being that life may be made miserable, and God may be dishonored in the creatures he has made. If women make the customs of the world their criterion, they will become unfitted, both physically and mentally, for the duties of life. Many have done themselves untold injury by compressing the waist. Their power to do good in the family and in society is greatly lessened; and if they are mothers, their children are robbed of vitality. When the waist is compressed, the circulation of the blood is impeded, and the internal organs, cramped and crowded out of place, cannot perform their work properly. It is impossible, under such circumstances, to take a full inspiration. Thus the pernicious habit of breathing only with the upper part of the lungs is formed, and feebleness and disease are often the result. { CTBH 88.1 } 
 

  Every act of our lives affects others for good or evil. Our influence is tending upward or downward; it is felt, acted upon, and to a greater or less degree reproduced by others. If by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good.  In their turn they exert the same beneficial influence upon others, and thus hundreds and thousands are affected by our unconscious influence. If we by acts strengthen or force into activity the evil powers possessed by those around us, we share their sin and will have to render an account for the good we might have done them and did not do, because we made not God our strength, our guide, our counselor.—Testimonies for the Church 2:133 (1868). { CH 421.1} 

 

  Christ might have opened to men the deepest truths of science. He might have unlocked mysteries which have required many centuries of toil and study to penetrate. He might have made suggestions in scientific lines that till the close of time would have afforded food for thought and stimulus for invention. But He did not do this. He said nothing to gratify curiosity or to stimulate selfish ambition. He did not deal in abstract theories, but in that which is essential to the development of character, that which will enlarge man’s capacity for knowing God, and increase his power to do good. Instead of directing the people to study men’s theories about God, His word, or His works, Christ taught them to behold Him as manifested in His works, in His word, and by His providences. He brought their minds in contact with the mind of the Infinite. He unfolded principles that struck at the root of selfishness. { CT 34.2} 

 
  “Never man spake like this Man.” John 7:46. This would have been true of Christ had He taught only in the realm of the physical and the intellectual, or in matters of theory and speculation solely. He might have unlocked mysteries that have required centuries of toil and study to penetrate. He might have made suggestions in scientific lines that, till the close of time, would have afforded food for thought and stimulus for invention. But He did not do this. He said nothing to gratify curiosity or to stimulate selfish ambition. He did not deal in abstract theories, but in that which is essential to the development of character; that which will enlarge man’s capacity for knowing God, and increase his power to do good. He spoke of those truths that relate to the conduct of life and that unite man with eternity. { Ed 81.1} 
 

  Abraham’s great act of faith stands like a pillar of light, illuminating the pathway of God’s servants in all succeeding ages. During that three days’ journey Abraham had sufficient time to reason and to doubt God. He might have reasoned that the slaying of his son would cause him to be looked upon as a murderer, a second Cain; it would cause his teaching to be rejected and despised, and thus destroy his power to do good to his fellowmen. He might have pleaded that age should excuse him from obedience. But the patriarch did not take refuge in excuses. Abraham was human; his passions and attachments were like ours; but he did not stay to reason with his aching heart. He knew that God is just and righteous in all His requirements. { EP 95.1 } 

 

  You are wholly dependent upon the Great Physician for the ability and power to do good work. Cling to Jesus. He will give you sharpness of intellect to discern with readiness, and steadiness of nerve to execute with precision. — Letter 3, 1901. { MM 34.4} 
 
  This is a responsibility from which we cannot free ourselves. Our words, our acts, our dress, our deportment, even the expression of the countenance, has an influence. Upon the impression thus made there hang results for good or evil which no man can measure. Every impulse thus imparted is seed sown which will produce its harvest. It is a link in the long chain of human events, extending we know not whither. If by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good. In their turn they exert the same influence upon others, and they upon still others. Thus by our unconscious influence thousands may be blessed. { MYP 417.3} 
 

  Abraham’s great act of faith stands like a pillar of light, illuminating the pathway of God’s servants in all succeeding ages. Abraham did not seek to excuse himself from doing the will of God. During that three days’ journey he had sufficient time to reason, and to doubt God, if he was disposed to doubt. He might have reasoned that the slaying of his son would cause him to be looked upon as a murderer, a second Cain; that it would cause his teaching to be rejected and despised; and thus destroy his power to do good to his fellow men. He might have pleaded that age should excuse him from obedience. But the patriarch did not take refuge in any of these excuses. Abraham was human; his passions and attachments were like ours; but he did not stop to question how the promise could be fulfilled if Isaac should be slain. He did not stay to reason with his aching heart. He knew that God is just and righteous in all His requirements, and he obeyed the command to the very letter. { PP 153.3} 

 

  Our words, our acts, our dress, our deportment, even the expression of the countenance, has an influence.... If by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good. In their turn they exert the same influence upon others, and they upon still others. Thus by our unconscious influence thousands may be blessed.... { AG 231.4} 
 
  [Christ] did not deal in abstract theories, but in that which is essential to the development of character; that which will enlarge man’s capacity for knowing God, and increase his power to do good.  He spoke of those truths that relate to the conduct of life and that unite man with eternity. { LHU 177.2} 
 

  God Gives Me Power to Do Good, April 24  --  Improving My Talents  --  He that doeth good is of God.  3 John 11  { ML 118.1 } 

All power to do good is God-given.... To God belongs all the glory for the wise and good deeds of human agents. { ML 118.6 } 

 

  This is a responsibility from which we cannot free ourselves. Our words, our acts, our dress, our deportment, even the expression of the countenance, has an influence. Upon the impression thus made there hang results for good or evil which no man can measure. Every impulse thus imparted is seed sown which will produce its harvest. It is a link in the long chain of human events, extending, we know not whither. If by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good. In their turn they exert the same influence upon others, and they upon still others. Thus by our unconscious influence thousands may be blessed. { RC 262.4} 
 
  Scripture is the key that unlocks Scripture. The suppositions of men are worthless. Great care is to be exercised, lest human fallacies be brought in. Every student is to be educated to give a clear exposition of the Word, according to the example Christ has given in His teaching. He said nothing to gratify curiosity or to stimulate selfish ambition. He did not deal in abstract theories, but in that which is essential to the development of character, that which will enlarge man’s capacity for knowing God, and increase his power to do good.  He spoke of those truths that relate to the conduct of life, and that unite man with eternity. We read that the common people heard Him gladly. The people “were astonished at his doctrine: for his word was with power” ( Luke 4:32). { UL 86.2} 
 

  Christ might have opened to men the deepest truths of science. He might have unlocked mysteries that have required many centuries of toil and study to penetrate. He might have made suggestions in scientific lines that till the close of time would have afforded food for thought and stimulus for invention. But he did not do this. He said nothing to gratify curiosity or to stimulate selfish ambition. He did not deal in abstract theories, but in that which is essential to the development of character, that which will enlarge man’s capacity for knowing God, and increase his power to do good. { RH January 16, 1913, par. 8 }

 

  The larger the intrusted wealth, the greater the responsibility. He who had large supplies yet who failed to succor the needy, will have large retribution. Justice will come upon the possessor of wealth if he has selfishly withheld it from those who needed its benefit. The condemnation that will come upon him who had great gifts will be that it was in his power to do good, to relieve the suffering, and he failed to do it. If men would keep the commandments of God, they would practice mercy and the love of God. Man would be upright in his dealings with his fellow-man; but he who serves not God places no restrictions upon his ambitions, and gives himself up wholly to covetousness, and thus he ruins his soul. He becomes miserable and discontented and unsatisfied, because he would grasp more of the world’s wealth than he can get in his possession; and thus the more the covetous rich man has, the more miserable he becomes. { ST June 25, 1894, par. 6 }
 
  Fathers and mothers should have clear, unclouded minds, unaffected by the indulgence of perverted appetite,—such minds as God can connect with himself for the salvation of souls who are ready to perish. Those who use wine and fermented liquors weaken their physical and mental powers. Their minds become so clouded that it is impossible for them to discern sacred things. But if the human agent shall cooperate with divine agency, his physical and mental development will become higher and better. His mind will enlarge, and he will grow in power to do good. The grandest, most effectual work can be done by parents who follow the instruction of the Lord, and who train their children physically, mentally, and morally according to the Lord’s directions. If parents neglect to properly instruct their children, and the youth are left to have their own will and way from the days of their childhood, their characters will be greatly perverted; for the enemy will step in and rejoicingly take into his hands the work of training the children and youth. { ST April 16, 1896, par. 4 }
 

  By the atmosphere surrounding us, every person with whom we come in contact is consciously or unconsciously affected. This is a responsibility from which we can not free ourselves. Our words, our acts, our dress, our deportment, even the expression of the countenance has an influence that no man can measure. Every impulse thus imparted is a seed sown that will produce its harvest. It is a link in the long chain of human events, extending we know not whither. If by our example we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good; in their turn they exert the same influence upon others, and they upon still others. Thus by our unconscious influence thousands may be blessed. { ST July 2, 1902, par. 11 }

 

  This is a responsibility from which we can not free ourselves. Our words, our acts, our deportment, even the expression of the countenance, has an influence. Upon the impression thus made there hang results for good or for evil which no man can measure. Every impulse thus imparted is a seed sown which will produce its harvest. It is a link in the long chain of human events extending we know not whither. If, by our example, we aid others in the development of good principles, we give them power to do good. In their turn they exert the same influence upon others, and they upon still others. Thus by our unconscious influence many may be blessed. On the other hand, one rash act, one thoughtless word, may prove the ruin of some soul. One blemish on the character may turn many away from Christ. { ST October 21, 1903, par. 5 }
 
  Of Christ’s teaching, the witness borne by those who heard Him is, “Never man spake like this Man.” This would have been true of Christ had He taught only in the realm of the physical and the intellectual, or in matters of theory and speculation solely. He might have unlocked mysteries that have required centuries of toil and study to penetrate. He might have made suggestions in scientific lines that, till the close of time, would have afforded food for thought and stimulus for invention. But He did not do this. He said nothing to gratify curiosity or stimulate selfish ambition. He did not deal in abstract theories, but in that which is essential to the development of character; that which will enlarge man’s capacity for knowing God, and increase his power to do good.  He spoke of those truths that relate to the conduct of life, and that unite man with eternity. { ST June 7, 1905, Art. A, par. 7 }
 

  “Never man spake like this man.” John 7:46. This would have been true of Christ had he taught only in the realm of the physical and the intellectual, or in matters of theory and speculation solely. He might have unlocked mysteries that have required centuries of toil and study to penetrate. He might have made suggestions in scientific lines that, till the close of time, would have afforded food for thought and stimulus for invention. But he did not do this. He said nothing to gratify curiosity or to stimulate selfish ambition. He did not deal in abstract theories, but in that which is essential to the development of character; that which will enlarge man’s capacity for knowing God, and increase his power to do good. He spoke of those truths that relate to the conduct of life, and that unite man with eternity. { SW February 11, 1908, par. 8 }

 

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