Man of integrity (20)

   Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                m a n     o f     I N T E G R I T Y          (  3  RELATED  PHRASES )                        

                       The  phrase  'man of integrity'  appears  20  times in the published writings of EGW                                          page not on Original site                                                                                 Related phrase:     men of integrity ( below ) ( 5 )   - -    unwavering firmness  (  )       

  It may be a difficult matter for men in high positions to pursue the path of undeviating integrity whether they shall receive praise or censure. Yet this is the only safe course. All the rewards which they might gain by selling their honor would be only as the breath from polluted lips, as dross to be consumed in the fire. Those who have moral courage to stand in opposition to the vices and errors of their fellow-men—it may be of those whom the world honor—will receive hatred, insult, and abusive falsehood. They may be thrust down from their high position, because they would not be bought or sold, because they could not be induced by bribes or threats to stain their hands with iniquity. Everything on earth may seem to conspire against them; but God has set his seal upon his own work. They may be regarded by their fellow-men as weak, unmanly, unfit to hold office; but how differently does the Most High regard them. Those who despise them are the really ignorant. While the storms of calumny and reviling may pursue the man of integrity through life, and beat upon his grave, God has the “well done” prepared for him. Folly and iniquity will at best yield only a life of unrest and discontent, and at its close a thorny dying pillow. And how many, as they view their course of action and its results, are led to end with their own hands their disgraceful career. And beyond all this waits the Judgment, and the final, irrevocable doom, Depart! { ST February 2, 1882, Art. A, par. 5 }   Read entire article in ST

 

 
  10. Undeviating Integrity Is Only Safe Course — It may be a difficult matter for men in high positions to pursue the path of undeviating integrity whether they shall receive praise or censure. Yet this is the only safe course. All the rewards which they might gain by selling their honor would be only as the breath from polluted lips, as dross to be consumed in the fire. Those who have moral courage to stand in opposition to the vices and errors of their fellow men—it may be of those whom the world honor—will receive hatred, insult, and abusive falsehood. They may be thrust down from their high position, because they would not be bought or sold, because they could not be induced by bribes or threats to stain their hands with iniquity. Everything on earth may seem to conspire against them; but God has set His seal upon His own work. They may be regarded by their fellow men as weak, unmanly, unfit to hold office; but how differently does the Most High regard them. Those who despise them are the really ignorant. While the storms of calumny and reviling may pursue the man of integrity through life, and beat upon his grave, God has the “well done” prepared for him. Folly and iniquity will at best yield only a life of unrest and discontent, and at its close a thorny dying pillow. And how many, as they view their course of action and its results, are led to end with their own hands their disgraceful career. And beyond all this waits the judgment, and the final, irrevocable doom, Depart ( Signs of the Times, February 2, 1882)!   { 4BC 1171.4 } 

 

  The Jewish religion was under the protection of the Roman power, and the accusers of Paul thought that if they could fasten upon him the charge of violating the laws of their religion, he would probably be delivered to them for trial and sentence. They hoped thus to compass his death. But Gallio was a man of integrity, and he refused to become the dupe of the jealous, intriguing Jews. Disgusted with their bigotry and self-righteousness, he would take no notice of the charge. As Paul prepared to speak in self-defense, Gallio told him that it was not necessary. Then turning to the angry accusers, he said, “If it were a matter of wrong or wicked lewdness, O ye Jews, reason would that I should bear with you: but if it be a question of words and names, and of your law, look ye to it; for I will be no judge of such matters. And he drove them from the judgment seat.” { AA 253.1} and { TT 135.1 } 

 

  Clouds were gathering that threatened not only Paul’s own safety, but also the prosperity of the church. In Rome he had been placed in the charge of the captain of the imperial guards, a man of integrity, by whose clemency he was left comparatively free to pursue gospel work. But this man was replaced by an official from whom the apostle could expect no special favor. { TT 255.1 } 

 

  “And when he had spoken such words unto me, I set my face toward the ground, and I became dumb. And, behold, one like the similitude of the sons of men touched my lips.... And said, O man greatly beloved, fear not: peace be unto thee, be strong, yea, be strong. And when he had spoken unto me, I was strengthened, and said, Let my Lord speak; for thou hast strengthened me” ( verses 15-19). So great was the divine glory revealed to Daniel that he could not endure the sight. Then the messenger of heaven veiled the brightness of his presence and appeared to the prophet as “one like the similitude of the sons of men” ( verse 16). By his divine power he strengthened this man of integrity and of faith, to hear the message sent to him from God.  { SL 51.3}  and  { RH February 8, 1881, par. 32 }

 

  Gallio was a man of integrity, and would not become the dupe of the jealous and intriguing Jews. Unlike Pilate, he refused to do injustice to one whom he knew to be an innocent man. The Jewish religion was under the protection of the Roman power; and the accusers of Paul thought that if they could fasten upon him the charge of violating the laws of their religion, he would probably be given into their hands for such punishment as they saw fit to inflict. They hoped thus to compass his death. { LP 108.2 }  and  { 3SP 414.2 } and  { 8Red 64.3 } 

 

  So great was the divine glory revealed to Daniel that he could not endure the sight. Then the messenger of heaven veiled the brightness of his presence and appeared to the prophet as “one like the similitude of the sons of men” ( verse 16).  By his divine power he strengthened this man of integrity and of faith, to hear the message sent to him from God. { RC 90.5} 

 

  The experience of Gideon and his army, was designed to teach a lesson of simplicity and faith. The leader whom God had chosen occupied no prominent position in Israel. He was not a ruler, a Levite, or a priest. He thought himself the least in his father’s house. Human wisdom would not have selected him; but God saw in Gideon a man of integrity and moral courage. He was distrustful of self, and willing to listen to the teachings of God, and carry out His purposes. { YRP 261.4} 
  The experience of Gideon and his army, was designed to teach a lesson of simplicity and faith. The leader whom God had chosen occupied no prominent position in Israel. He was not a ruler, a Levite, or a priest. He thought himself the least in his father’s house. Human wisdom would not have selected him; but God saw in Gideon a man of integrity and moral courage. He was distrustful of self, and willing to listen to the teachings of God, and carry out his purposes. The Lord is not dependent upon men of high position, of great intellect, or extensive knowledge. Such men are frequently proud and self-sufficient. They feel themselves competent to devise and execute plans without counsel from God. They separate themselves from the true Vine, and hence become dry and fruitless, as withered branches. { ST June 30, 1881, par. 16 }

 

  A general slain in battle is lost to his army, but his death gives no additional strength to the enemy. But when a man of integrity and sterling principle joins the opposing force, not only are his services lost, but those to whom he joins himself gain a decided advantage. Saul of Tarsus might easily have been struck dead by the Lord as he was on his way to Damascus, and much strength would have been withdrawn from the persecuting power. But his life was spared, and in the providence of God he was carried from the side of the enemy to the side of Christ. An eloquent speaker and a severe critic, Paul, with his stern purpose and undaunted courage, possessed the very qualifications needed in the Christian church. { RH March 30, 1911, Art. A, par. 3 }  and  { YI November 15, 1900, par. 5 }

 

  “Ye shall not steal, neither deal falsely, neither lie one to another.” All liars are to have their part in the lake of fire, and yet there are more falsehoods told and acted than many suppose. All deception and overstatements are falsehoods. A truthful man, a man of integrity, will not designedly produce impressions by language or signs that are not strictly true. He will not allow any to receive from him that which he knows to be incorrect. A falsehood consists in an intention to deceive. A look of the eye, a motion of the hand, an expression of the countenance, will tell a falsehood as effectually as words. Hints and insinuations which leave an exaggerated impression on minds are falsehoods. Says the apostle, “Lie not one to another.” The case of Ananias and Sapphira shows that even in the gospel age retribution as severe as that of the Jewish age breaks forth upon the guilty. { ST July 22, 1880, par. 7 }

 

  Many cases have been shown me in vision where the first evil seed sown in the family was an expression, look, or act of doubt on the part of the wife in regard to her husband’s love or his attentions. Nothing can wound a man of integrity like this—to know that she who has given him her hand and has given her life’s happiness into his keeping distrusts him, that he has not her entire confidence; that his words, his goings out and his comings in are watched with uneasiness and jealousy; that he cannot act without restraint in the society of friends who visit him; that he cannot be cheerful, happy, or social with his friends; that an eye is upon him and he must act guardedly and restrained. A barrier is soon formed between the two who should have perfect trust in each other; then coldness and neglect follow, and the husband is driven by the jealousy of his wife to find in other society that which he cannot find at home with his wife and children.—Letter 9, 1864, p. 2. (To Sister Howland, March 20, 1864.) { 10MR 25.1 } 

 

  Paul’s accusers thought that if they could fasten on him the charge of violating the Jewish religion, which was under the protection of the Roman power, he would probably be handed over to them for trial and sentence. But Gallio, a man of integrity, refused. Disgusted with their prejudice and self-righteousness, he would not allow the charge to stand. As Paul prepared to speak in self-defense, Gallio told him it was not necessary. Then turning to the angry accusers, he said: “‘If it were a matter of wrongdoing or wicked crimes, O Jews, there would be reason why I should bear with you. But if it is a question of words and names and your own law, look to it yourselves; for I do not want to be a judge of such matters.’ And he drove them from the judgment seat.” { ULe 94.3 } 

 

   Clouds were gathering that threatened not only Paul’s own safety, but also the prosperity of the church. In Rome he had been placed in the charge of the captain of the imperial guards, who was a man of integrity. The captain left him comparatively free to carry on the gospel work. But this man was replaced by an official who was unlikely to offer the apostle any special favor. { ULe 178.1

 

            m e n     o f     I N T E G R I T Y                                       

             

     Presidents of Conferences should be men who can be fully trusted with God’s work. They should be men of integrity, unselfish, devoted, working Christians. If they are deficient in these respects, the churches under their care will not prosper. They, even more than other ministers of Christ, should set an example of holy living, and of unselfish devotion to the interests of God’s cause, that those looking to them for an example may not be misled. But in some instances they are trying to serve both God and mammon. They are not self-denying; they do not carry a burden for souls. Their consciences are not sensitive; when the cause of God is wounded, they are not bruised in spirit. In their hearts they question and doubt the Testimonies of the Spirit of God. They do not themselves bear the cross of Christ; they know not the fervent love of Jesus. And they are not faithful shepherds of the flock over which they have been made overseers; their record is not one that they will rejoice to meet in the day of God. — Testimonies for the Church 5:379.  { GW92 257.4 }  and  { PaM 106.2} 

 

  The teaching of the Bible would have implanted in the hearts of the people principles of justice, temperance, and truth, which are the cornerstone of a nation’s prosperity. “Righteousness exalteth a nation.” Thereby “the throne is established.” Proverbs 14:34; 16:12. See Isaiah 32:17. He who obeys the divine law will most truly respect and obey the laws of the country. France prohibited the Bible. Century after century men of integrity, of intellectual and moral strength, who had the faith to suffer for truth, toiled as slaves in the galleys, perished at the stake, or rotted in dungeon cells. Thousands found safety in flight for 250 years after the opening of the Reformation. { HF 173.3 } 

 

  God does not make a decree that men’s hearts shall become hard and unimpressible. It is the resistance of light, a refusal to hear the voice of warning and reproof which strengthens the soul in a position of resistance. He is sowing the seed of resistance, which he must reap in a harvest of hardness of heart. Men burden their own hearts in their impenitence. They have sown the seed; they reap what they have sown. The precious opportunity that might have aroused the church and brought them to a sense of their true state, is lost by the unconsecrated influence of men who will not humble their hearts before God. The ministers whom God ordains and accepts as his chosen laborers will be men of integrity. They may, some of them, be unlearned and ignorant men; but grace will reign in their hearts, inspiring them with faith and purifying the motives that govern the outward conduct. They will be living examples of the mind and spirit of Christ, known and read of all men. { PH155 9.3 } 

 

  

 

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