Pick and choose

         Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                p i c k    a n d    C H O O S E           (  3  RELATED  PHRASES )                      

                       The  phrase  'Pick and Choose'  appears  12  times in the published writings of EGW                 See page on Original site                                               Related phrase:   choose the right  ( 39 )  - -  pick and choose companions  ( below ) - - pick and choose the work  ( see below )

But this doing the duty of a soldier means work. It is not always just such work as we would choose. Outward inconveniences, difficulties, and trials have to be borne by the soldiers of Jesus. There is a constant warfare to be maintained against the evils and inclinations of our own natural hearts. We must not pick and choose the work most agreeable to us; for we are Christ's soldiers, under His discipline, and we are not to study our own pleasure. We must fight the battles of the Lord manfully. We have enemies to conquer that would gain the control of all our powers. {YRP 346.2} 

 

 
There are some that may think they are fully capable with their finite judgment to take the Word of God, and to state what are the words of inspiration, and what are not the words of inspiration. I want to warn you off that ground, my brethren in the ministry. "Put off thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground." There is no finite man that lives, I care not who he is or whatever is his position, that God has authorized to pick and choose in His Word.  {7BC 919.2}
 
Now, there are some that may think they are fully capable with their finite judgment to take the Word of God, and to state what are the words of inspiration and what are not the words of inspiration. I want to warn you off that ground, my brethren in the ministry. "Put off thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground." There is no finite man that lives, I care not who he is or whatever is his position, that God has authorized to pick and choose in His Word.  {1SAT 64.3}

 

 
Many do not look upon preaching as Christ's appointed means of instructing His people and therefore always to be highly prized. They do not feel that the sermon is the word of the Lord to them and estimate it by the value of the truths spoken; but they judge it as they would the speech of a lawyer at the bar--by the argumentative skill displayed and the power and beauty of the language. The minister is not infallible, but God has honored him by making him His messenger. If you listen to him as though he were not commissioned from above you will not respect his words nor receive them as the message of God. Your souls will not feed upon the heavenly manna; doubts will arise concerning some things that are not pleasing to the natural heart, and you will sit in judgment upon the sermon as you would upon the remarks of a lecturer or a political speaker. As soon as the meeting closes you will be ready with some complaint or sarcastic remark, thus showing that the message, however true and needful, has not profited you. You esteem it not; you have learned the habit of criticizing and finding fault, and you pick and choose, and perhaps reject the very things that you most need.  {5T 298.2}
       very  similar  to
Many do not look upon preaching as Christ's appointed means of instructing his people, and therefore always to be highly prized. They do not feel that the sermon is the word of the Lord to them, and estimate it by the value of the truths spoken; but they judge it as they would the speech of a lawyer at the bar,--by the argumentative skill displayed, and the power and beauty of the language. The minister is not infallible, but God has honored him by making him his messenger. If his hearers listen to him as though he were not commissioned from above, they will not respect his words, nor receive them as the message of God. Their souls will not feed upon the heavenly manna; doubts will arise concerning some things that are not pleasing to the natural heart, and they will sit in judgment upon the sermon, as they would upon the remarks of a lecturer or a political speaker. As soon as the meeting closes, they will be ready with some complaint or sarcastic remark, thus showing that the message, however true and needful, has not profited them. They esteem it not; they have learned the habit of criticising and finding fault, and they pick and choose, and perhaps reject the very things that they most need.  {RH, April 7, 1885 par. 2}
 

There are ministers who have not fed the flock of God. While their salaries have been paid, they are not men who are converted to God. There must be a weeding out of ministers; for they are not converted. We want to have the talent right in among us that has worked up to be used in our conference. But if there is no spirituality to discern where that talent is,or to train and discipline it for the work, what then? Why if there is talent in other fields, do not say, "We are going to furnish our own talent here in Michigan, and we do not want anybody to work in Michigan unless they are Michigan men." Who told you to prescribe for God? Who told you to say what men should be over you? This is contrary to all the light that God has given me. You have no right to pick and choose according to your plans. No, indeed. Ask God to send out the very men who will help you most; to send you the very men that are qualified to take and elevate and carry the churches in your place to a higher standard. That is what you are to do. When you do this, God will work with you. When we do this, He will lift what we are trying to lift.  {1SAT 169.3}

 
Supposing that Christ should deal with all his sons and daughters who learn of him, as the human agent, as teachers deal with those under their charge; that when the law of the Lord, his rules, his injunctions, have been disregarded by us, the guilty were expelled or suspended, turning the erring away from his saving, uplifting, educating influences, leaving him to pick and choose his own way and course of action without Christ's divine assistance; what would become of our souls? Christ's constant, forgiving love is binding up our souls' interest with himself. O the mightiness of the love of Jesus overwhelms me as I consider it. The yoke of Christ is easy, and his burden is light. When we enter more entirely into the love of Jesus by practice, we shall see far different results in our own advancement as Christians, and in the molding of the characters of those brought into relationship with us. The most difficult business for individuals is the giving up of that which one thinks is his right. Love seeketh not her own. Heaven-born love strikes deeper then the surface. Love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up. Fortified with the grace of Christ, love doth not behave itself unseemly. He that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God. God is love. We all need love, gentleness, tenderness, compassion, forbearance. Expel from the soul every vestige of selfishness of human dignity.  {SpM 145.3}  {FE 282.1}

 

 

                                                pick  and  choose  their   companions                                                             

 

Studies should generally be few and well chosen, and those who attend our colleges are to have a different training than that of the common schools of the day. They have been generally taught upon Christian principles, if they have wise and God-fearing parents. The word of God has been respected in their homes, and its teachings made the law of the home. They have been brought up in the nurture and admonition of the gospel, and when they come to the schools, this same education and training is to go on. The world's maxims, the world's customs and practices, are not the teaching they need; but they are to see that the teachers in the schools care for their souls, that they will take a decided interest in their spiritual welfare, and religion is to be the great principle inculcated; for the love and fear of God are the beginning of wisdom. Youth removed from the domestic atmosphere, from the home rule and guardianship of parents, if left to themselves to pick and choose their companions, meet with a crisis in their history not generally favorable to piety or principle.  {CE 47.2}  {FE 115.1}
 
God's word must be opened to the youth, but a youth should not be placed in the position to do this. Those who must have an eye upon them constantly to insure their good behavior, will require to be watched in any position where they may be. Therefore the mold given the character in youth by such a system of training, is wholly deleterious. Aim for mental discipline and the formation of right moral sentiments and habits. Studies should generally be few and well chosen, and those who attend our colleges are to have a different training than that of the common schools of the day. They have been generally taught upon Christian principles, if they have wise and God-fearing parents. The word of God has been respected in their homes, and its teachings made the law of the home. They have been brought up in the nurture and admonition of the gospel, and when they come to the schools, this same education and training is to go on. The world's maxims, the world's customs and practices, are not the teaching they need; but they are to see that the teachers in the schools care for their souls, that they will take a decided interest in their spiritual welfare, and religion is to be the great principle inculcated; for the love and fear of God are the beginning of wisdom. Youth removed from the domestic atmosphere, from the home rule and guardianship of parents, if left to themselves to pick and choose their companions, meet with a crisis in their history not generally favorable to piety or principle.  {RH, June 21, 1887 par. 5}

 

                                                      pick  and  choose  the  work                                                             

 

 But this doing the duty of a soldier means work. It is not always just such work as we would choose. Outward inconveniences, difficulties, and trials have to be borne by the soldiers of Jesus. There is a constant warfare to be maintained against the evils and inclinations of our own natural hearts. We must not pick and choose the work most agreeable to us; for we are Christ's soldiers, under his discipline, and we are not to study our own pleasure. We must fight the battles of the Lord manfully. We have enemies to conquer that would gain the control of all our powers. Self-will in us must die; Christ's will alone must be obeyed. The soldier in Christ's army must learn to endure hardness, deny self, take up the cross, and follow where his Captain leads the way. There are many things to do which are trying to human nature, and painful to flesh and blood. This work of self-subduing requires determined, continuous effort. In fighting the good fight of faith, obtaining precious victories, we are laying hold of eternal life. This warfare requires most strenuous effort, the exertion of all our powers. We are to crucify the flesh, with the affections and lusts. I would that our youth would engage in this work which requires the exercise of every spiritual muscle, the strength of every power. And as they manifest faithfulness in any and every position of duty, they will be promoted, and positions of responsibility will be given them. The great work of saving souls is committed to them. They are to be laborers together with Christ; and this means a life-long service, a life of spiritual hardships and conflict, until the laborer's work ends with his life. There is no spiritual self-indulgence in a truly religious life. Dear youth, do you think Christ requires too much when he calls you to earnestly exercise your ability, your tact, your intellect, all your powers, in his service? We dare not do otherwise than to faithfully present before you the conditions, just as they are. We dare not lower the standard to gain recruits under false pretenses. We would have each of you move understandingly, counting the cost. It is a noble work to serve Jesus Christ, who gave his own life, his riches, his glory, in order to rescue us from the power of Satan. We are toiling for a precious, glorious crown and an inheritance that is immortal. The reward is promised: "To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me on my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne."  {YI, December 22, 1886 par. 6}

 

 

 

 

 

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Choose the right