Divine patience

   Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

                d i v i n e    P A T i e n c e                                       (  2  RELATED  PHRASES )                      

                       The  phrase  'Divine patience'  appears  1xx  times in the published writings of EGW                                                    See page on Original site                                                                                           Related Phrase:   divine patience ceases  (  )   - -   forbearance of God  (  )

   You who are slighting the offers of mercy, let consideration come in, and scatter the delusions which have gathered about your soul. Think of the long array of figures that is accumulating against you in the books of Heaven; for there is an unerring record kept of the impieties of nations, of families, of individuals. God may bear long while the account goes on, and calls to repentance and offers of pardon may be given; yet a time will come when the account will be full, and divine patience will be exercised no longer. Then the signal will be given for the wrath of offended justice to be poured out, for judgment to be executed.  {ST, September 11, 1884 par. 10}

 

  With unerring accuracy, the Infinite One still kept an account with all nations. While His mercy is tendered, with calls to repentance, this account will remain open; but when the figures reach a certain amount which God has fixed, the ministry of His wrath commences. The account is closed. Divine patience ceases. There is no more pleading of mercy in their behalf. . . . {CET 186.2}

 

  Our God is a God of mercy. With long-sufferance and tender compassion He deals with the transgressors of His law. . . . But there is a point beyond which divine patience is exhausted, and the judgments of God are sure to follow. The Lord bears long with men, and with cities, mercifully giving warnings to save them from divine wrath; but a time will come when pleadings for mercy will no longer be heard. . . .  {CC 231.2}
 
  Jesus dealt him no sharp rebuke for his covetousness, but with divine patience bore with this erring man, even while giving him evidence that He read his heart as an open book. He presented before him the highest incentives for right doing; and in rejecting the light of Heaven, Judas would be without excuse.  {DA 295.2}

 

hese words were said in no whispered tones. All eyes were turned to see whence they came. Who had spoken? It was the centurion, the Roman soldier. The divine patience of the Saviour, and His sudden death, with the cry of victory upon His lips, had impressed this heathen. In the bruised, broken body hanging upon the cross, the centurion recognized the form of the Son of God. He could not refrain from confessing his faith. Thus again evidence was given that our Redeemer was to see of the travail of His soul. Upon the very day of His death, three men, differing widely from one another, had declared their faith,-- he who commanded the Roman guard, he who bore the cross of the Saviour, and he who died upon the cross at His side.  {DA 770.2}
 
Let us not be in the position of those for whom the Saviour has died in vain. In Christ there is sufficient grace to overcome all our evil traits of character, and strength is found alone in him. He bears long with us. If he had been like many, he would have sharply rebuked Judas for his covetousness; but what divine patience he manifested toward this erring man, even while he gave him evidence that he read his heart as an open book. He presented before him the highest incentives for right-doing, and if Judas rejected the light of heaven, he would be found guilty and without excuse.  {RH, March 17, 1891 par. 7}

 

When France publicly rejected God and set aside the Bible, wicked men and spirits of darkness exulted in their attainment of the object so long desired--a kingdom free from the restraints of the law of God. Because sentence against an evil work was not speedily executed, therefore the heart of the sons of men was "fully set in them to do evil." Ecclesiastes 8:11. But the transgression of a just and righteous law must inevitably result in misery and ruin. Though not visited at once with judgments, the wickedness of men was nevertheless surely working out their doom. Centuries of apostasy and crime had been treasuring up wrath against the day of retribution; and when their iniquity was full, the despisers of God learned too late that it is a fearful thing to have worn out the divine patience. The restraining Spirit of God, which imposes a check upon the cruel power of Satan, was in a great measure removed, and he whose only delight is the wretchedness of men was permitted to work his will. Those who had chosen the service of rebellion were left to reap its fruits until the land was filled with crimes too horrible for pen to trace. From devastated provinces and ruined cities a terrible cry was heard --a cry of bitterest anguish. France was shaken as if by an earthquake. Religion, law, social order, the family, the state, and the church--all were smitten down by the impious hand that had been lifted against the law of God. Truly spoke the wise man: "The wicked shall fall by his own wickedness." "Though a sinner do evil a hundred times, and his days be prolonged, yet surely I know that it shall be well with them that fear God, which fear before Him: but it shall not be well with the wicked." Proverbs 11:5; Ecclesiastes 8:12, 13. "They hated knowledge, and did not choose the fear of the Lord;" "therefore shall they eat of the fruit of their own way, and be filled with their own devices." Proverbs 1:29, 31.  {GC 286.1}
 
God allows men a period of probation; but there is a point beyond which divine patience is exhausted, and the judgments of God are sure to follow. The Lord bears long with men, and with cities, mercifully giving warnings to save them from divine wrath; but a time will come when pleadings for mercy will no longer be heard, and the rebellious element that continues to reject the light of truth will be blotted out, in mercy to themselves and to those who would otherwise be influenced by their example.  {PK 276.3}

 

Those who are deceiving souls will find that it is a most serious matter to have worn out divine patience. God's wrath will fall upon them signally, unexpectedly, fiercely. Though they may then humble themselves ever so much, there will be no further opportunity for repentance. They have persisted in leading souls to ruin. God's law has repeatedly been made void.  {21MR 68.3}

 

                                                        Divine   patience   ceases                                                                                  

 

   With unerring accuracy the Infinite One still keeps an account with all nations. While His mercy is tendered with calls to repentance, this account will remain open; but when the figures reach a certain amount which God has fixed, the ministry of His wrath commences. The account is closed. Divine patience ceases. There is no more pleading of mercy in their behalf.  {5T 208.2}

 

  With unerring accuracy the Infinite One still keeps an account with all nations. While His mercy is tendered, with calls to repentance, this account will remain open; but when the figures reach a certain amount which God has fixed, the ministry of His wrath commences. The account is closed. Divine patience ceases. There is no more pleading of mercy in their behalf.  {FLB 338.2}

 

  With unerring accuracy, the Infinite One keeps an account with all nations. While his mercy is tendered with calls to repentance, this account will remain open; but when a certain limit which God has fixed is reached, the ministry of his wrath commences. The account is closed. Divine patience ceases. There is no more pleading for mercy in their behalf.  {RH, January 11, 1887 par. 5}
  With unerring accuracy the Infinite One still keeps account with the nations. While his mercy is tendered, with calls to repentance, this account remains open; but when the figures reach a certain amount which God has fixed, the ministry of his wrath begins. The account is closed. Divine patience ceases. Mercy no longer pleads in their behalf.  {RH, June 3, 1915 par. 13}

 

   
   

 

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