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Phrase - Indifference ( spell of indifference )
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .
 
Spell  of  indifference
 
Again, Satan sees the Lord's servants burdened because of the spiritual darkness that enshrouds the people. He hears their earnest prayers for divine grace and power to break the spell of indifference, carelessness, and indolence. Then with renewed zeal he plies his arts. He tempts men to the indulgence of appetite or to some other form of self-gratification, and thus benumbs their sensibilities so that they fail to hear the very things which they most need to learn.  Great Controversy, page 519.1
 
The servants of Christ have a sacred work. They must copy his character and his ways and plans of reaching men. God does not want them to labor with their own finite power, but in his strength; he wants them to represent to the world, in their own characters, the Saviour's purity, benevolence, and love. The reason why we accomplish no more in the work of God is, that we need more spirit and life from Jesus in appealing to the conscience. Our own hard hearts must be melted by his love; this alone can break the spell of indifference, alarm the soul, and cause men to consider where they stand. A tame, formal sermon, argumentative though it may be, will accomplish little. We must have Jesus abiding in us, that the words we utter may be his words; our sluggish souls must be stirred by his Spirit, in order to bring us in close connection with the souls we wish to save. "Without me," says Christ, "ye can do nothing." In him we can do all things.  {RH, December 22, 1885 par. 11}
 
Again, Satan sees the Lord's servants burdened because of the spiritual darkness that enshrouds the people. He hears their earnest prayers for divine grace and power to break the spell of indifference, carelessness, and indolence. Then with renewed zeal he plies his arts. He tempts men to the indulgence of appetite or to some other form of self-gratification, and thus benumbs their sensibilities, so that they fail to hear the very things which they most need to learn.  {4SP 341.2}
 
In true religion there is nothing selfish or exclusive. The gospel of Christ is diffusive and aggressive. It is described as the salt of the earth, the transforming leaven, the light which shineth in darkness. It is impossible for one to retain the favor and love of God, and enjoy communion with Him, and still feel no responsibility for the souls for whom Christ died, who are in error and darkness, perishing in their sins. If those who profess to be followers of Christ neglect to shine as lights in the world, the vital power will leave them, and they will become cold and Christless. The spell of indifference will be upon them, a deathlike sluggishness of soul, which will make them bodies of death instead of living representatives of Jesus.  {TDG 211.3}
 
Again, Satan sees the Lord's servants burdened because of the spiritual darkness that enshrouds the people. He hears their earnest prayers for divine grace and power to break the spell of indifference, carelessness, and indolence. Then with renewed zeal he plies his arts. He tempts men to the indulgence of appetite or to some other form of self-gratification, and thus benumbs their sensibilities, so that they fail to hear the very things which they most need to learn.  {GC88 519.1}
indifference is apparent today
Man alone, he for whom this great sacrifice was made, manifested indifference. He who should above all other have been interested, charmed, captivated, and filled with the deepest gratitude was unmoved. This indifference is apparent today not only in those who are in open rebellion to God, but in those who process to be followers of Christ. These will receive the greater condemnation; for Christ is more greatly dishonored by those who profess his name, yet in works deny him, than by those who stand in open rebellion to his will. Christ is not put to shame by the sinful lives of sinners as he is by professed Christians whose lives are not circumspect, and sanctified by the truth they profess.  RH, July 15, 1909, par. 4
 
 
The  spell  of  indifference  will  be  upon  them
 
It is essential that these who have newly come to the faith should have a sense of their obligation to God, who has called them to a knowledge of the truth, and filled their hearts with his sacred peace, that they may exert a sanctifying influence over all with whom they associate. "Ye are my witnesses, saith the Lord." To every one God has committed a work, to make known his salvation to the world. In true religion there is nothing selfish or exclusive. The gospel of Christ is diffusive and aggressive. It is described as the salt of the earth, the transforming leaven, the light which shineth in darkness. It is impossible for one to retain the favor and love of God, and enjoy communion with him, and still feel no responsibility for the souls for whom Christ died, who are in error and darkness, perishing in their sins. If those who profess to be followers of Christ neglect to shine as lights in the world, the vital power will leave them, and they will become cold and Christless. The spell of indifference will be upon them, a death-like sluggishness of soul, which will make them bodies of death instead of living representatives of Jesus. Every one must lift the cross, and in modesty, meekness, and lowliness of mind, take up his God-given duties, engaging in personal effort for those around him who need help and light. All who accept these duties will have a rich and varied experience, their own hearts will glow with fervor, and they will be strengthened and stimulated to renewed, persevering efforts  to work out their own salvation with fear and trembling, because it is God that worketh in them both to will and to do of his good pleasure.  {RH, July 21, 1891 par. 4}
 
 
 
 
 
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