Home > Prophecy > Spirit of Prophecy Section > Selected Quotations - EGW ( 6,000 phrases ) > Date: the year 1844 (16 ) >
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Spring of 1844 ( 14 ) Summer 1844
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .
the  spring  of  1844
Related phrases:   summer of 1844  ( below )   - -   autum of 1844  (  )
When the time passed at which the Lord's coming was first expected, -- in the spring of 184. -- those who had looked in faith for His appearing were for a season involved in doubt and uncertainty. While the world regarded them as having been utterly defeated and proved to have been cherishing a delusion, their source of consolation was still the word of God. Many continued to search the Scriptures, examining anew the evidences of their faith and carefully studying the prophecies to obtain further light. The Bible testimony in support of their position seemed clear and conclusive. Signs which could not be mistaken pointed to the coming of Christ as near. The special blessing of the Lord, both in the conversion of sinners and the revival of spiritual life among Christians, had testified that the message was of Heaven. And though the believers could not explain their disappointment, they felt assured that God had led them in their past experience.  Great Controversy page 391.1   Read entire chapter 22
 
 
Miller and his associates at first believed that the 2300 days would terminate in the spring of 1844, whereas the prophecy points to the autumn of that year. (See Appendix.) The misapprehension of this point brought disappointment and perplexity to those who had fixed upon the earlier date as the time of the Lord’s coming. But this did not in the least affect the strength of the argument showing that the 2300 days terminated in the year 1844, and that the great event represented by the cleansing of the sanctuary must then take place.  Great Controversy, page 328.3  Read entire chapter 18
 
 
The testimony of the prophecies which seemed to point to the coming of Christ in the spring of 1844 took deep hold of the minds of the people. As the message went from state to state, there was everywhere awakened widespread interest. Many were convinced that the arguments from the prophetic periods were correct, and, sacrificing their pride of opinion, they joyfully received the truth. Some ministers laid aside their sectarian views and feelings, left their salaries and their churches, and united in proclaiming the coming of Jesus. There were comparatively few ministers, however, who would accept this message; therefore it was largely committed to humble laymen. Farmers left their fields, mechanics their tools, traders their merchandise, professional men their positions; and yet the number of workers was small in comparison with the work to be accomplished. The condition of an ungodly church and a world lying in wickedness, burdened the souls of the true watchmen, and they willingly endured toil, privation, and suffering, that they might call men to repentance unto salvation. Though opposed by Satan, the work went steadily forward, and the advent truth was accepted by many thousands.  Great Controversy, page 368.2  Read entire chapter 20
 
 
 
This is one of the early cases in connection with the proclamation of the soon coming of the Lord that the message of the second angel of Revelation 14 seemed to apply: “Babylon is fallen, is fallen, that great city” ( verse 8). (The message was repeated in Revelation 18, with the added warning: “Come out of her, my people” [verse 4].) It was to become clearly recognized a few months later, in the spring of 1844. { 1BIO 44.7 } 
 
The prophecies which seemed to point to the coming of Christ in the spring of 1844 took deep hold of the minds of the people. Many were convinced that the arguments from the prophetic periods were correct, and sacrificing pride of opinion, they joyfully received the truth. Some ministers left their salaries and churches and united in proclaiming the coming of Jesus. Comparatively few ministers, however, would accept this message; therefore it was largely committed to humble laymen. Farmers left their fields; mechanics, their tools; traders, their merchandise; professional men, their positions. They willingly endured toil, privation, and suffering, that they might call men to repentance unto salvation. The advent truth was accepted by thousands. { HF 229.1 } 
 
God designed to prove His people. His hand covered a mistake in the reckoning of the prophetic periods. The time of expectation [that is, that Christ would come in the spring of 1844] passed, and Christ did not appear. Those who had looked for their Saviour experienced a bitter disappointment. Yet God was testing the hearts of those who professed to be waiting for His appearing. Many had been actuated by fear. These persons declared that they had never believed that Christ would come. They were among the first to ridicule the sorrow of the true believers. { HF 232.1 } 
 
When April 21, 1844, passed -- the time first thought to be the end of the 2300 days -- and Jesus did not come, the believers checked and rechecked the basis of their reckoning. Ellen White explained this:  { 1BIO 49.2 }
 
 
summer  of  1844
 
In the summer of 1844, Adventists discovered the mistake in their former reckoning of the prophetic periods, and settled upon the correct position. The 2300 days of Daniel 8:14, which all believed to extend to the second coming of Christ, had been thought to end in the spring of 1844; but it was now seen that this period extended to the autumn of the same year, [See appendix, note 1.] and the minds of Adventists were fixed upon this point as the time for the Lord’s appearing. The proclamation of this time message was another step in the fulfillment of the parable of the marriage, whose application to the experience of Adventists had already been clearly seen. As in the parable the cry was raised at midnight announcing the approach of the bridegroom, so in the fulfillment, midway between the spring of 1844, when it was first supposed that the 2300 days would close, and the autumn of 1844, at which time it was afterward found that they were really to close, such a cry was raised, in the very words of Scripture: “Behold, the Bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him.” { 4SP 248.2 }  { SR 369.2} 
 
 
It was not the proclamation of the second advent that caused fanaticism and division. These appeared in the summer of 1844, when Adventists were in a state of doubt and perplexity concerning their real position. The preaching of the first angel's message and of the "midnight cry" tended directly to repress fanaticism and dissension. Those who participated in these solemn movements were in harmony; their hearts were filled with love for one another and for Jesus, whom they expected soon to see. The one faith, the one blessed hope, lifted them above the control of any human influence, and proved a shield against the assaults of Satan.  {GC 398.2}
"While the bridegroom tarried, they all slumbered and slept. And at midnight there was a cry made, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him. Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps." Matthew 25: 5-7. In the summer of 1844, midway between the time when it had been first thought that the 2300 days would end, and the autumn of the same year, to which it was afterward found that they extended, the message was proclaimed in the very words of Scripture: "Behold, the Bridegroom cometh!"   Great Controversy page 398.3    Read entire chapter 22
 
 
 
 
 
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