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Phrase - Use of Alcohol
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .

Use  of  Alcohol


Tobacco using is a habit which frequently affects the nervous system in a more powerful manner than does the use of alcohol. It binds the victim in stronger bands of slavery than does the intoxicating cup; the habit is more difficult to overcome. Body and mind are, in many cases, more thoroughly intoxicated with the use of tobacco than with spirituous liquors; for it is a more subtle poison.  {CG 403.3}

 
In order to reach the root of intemperance we must go deeper than the use of alcohol or tobacco. Idleness, lack of aim, or evil associations may be the predisposing cause. Often it is found at the home table, in families that account themselves strictly temperate. Anything that disorders digestion, that creates undue mental excitement or in any way enfeebles the system, disturbing the balance of the mental and the physical powers, weakens the control of the mind over the body, and thus tends toward intemperance. The downfall of many a promising youth might be traced to unnatural appetites created by an unwholesome diet.  {CG 402.3}

 
Tobacco using is a habit which frequently affects the nervous system in a more powerful manner than does the use of alcohol. It binds the victim in stronger bands of slavery than does the intoxicating cup; the habit is more difficult to overcome. Body and mind are, in many cases, more thoroughly intoxicated with the use of tobacco than with spirituous liquors, for it is a more subtle poison.-- Testimonies, vol. 3, p. 562.  {Te 55.2}
 
Tobacco using is a habit which frequently affects the nervous system in a more powerful manner than does the use of alcohol. It binds the victim in stronger bands of slavery than does the intoxicating cup; the habit is more difficult to overcome. Body and mind are, in many cases, more thoroughly intoxicated with the use of tobacco than with spirituous liquors; for it is a more subtle poison.--T., V. III, p. 562.   Healthful Living, page 110.3
 
In order to reach the root of intemperance we must go deeper than the use of alcohol or tobacco. Idleness, lack of aim, or evil associations may be the predisposing cause. Often it is found at the home table, in families that account themselves strictly temperate. Anything that disorders digestion, that creates undue mental excitement or in any way enfeebles the system, disturbing the balance of the mental and the physical powers, weakens the control of the mind over the body, and thus tends toward intemperance. The downfall of many a promising youth might be traced to unnatural appetites created by an unwholesome diet.  {CG 402.3}
 
Those in charge of our sanitariums are to give clear instruction regarding these things. Medical missionaries are to be ministers of the gospel, showing the sick that by violating the laws of life and health, they are deranging the machinery of the body. There are many who do not realize the necessity of carefully guarding the living machinery. Their minds are to be aroused to the harm they are doing themselves by indulging in wrong habits, by intemperance in eating and drinking. They are to be shown the necessity of discarding the use of alcohol and tobacco in every form. Our physicians are to go to the root of the matter, showing that sickness and suffering do not come from God, but are the result of a wrong course of action.  {PUR, March 23, 1905 par. 2}
 

"The work of this institution, as indicated in the various reports of the superintendent, is largely that of personal instruction to each patient upon the causes that lead to alcoholism, the effect upon the physical system and upon the mental and moral character, and the means to be used in overcoming the habit, and in antidoting this poison which has been imbibed into the system, and which permeates the whole being of man. The system of reform is not medicinal; it is not a system of drugging and purging, nor a gradual tapering off in the use of alcohol. The watchword at the portals of this institution is total abstinence from alcohol in every form. There are no alcoholic tinctures in medicines, no mild tonics, reinforced by other stimulants or narcotics, but total abstinence from the use of alcohol in any form, whether mixed with malt, quinine, ginger, eggs, milk, cider, or lemonade.  {RH, February 10, 1885 par. 9}
 

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