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Christ came to bring ( 20 )
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .
 
Christ  came  to  bring
 
God pitied the fallen race. He "so loved the world, that He gave His only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Christ came to bring life and immortality to those dead in trespasses and sins. Who is he that carries such a weight of responsibility? -- "There shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots; and the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon Him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and of the fear of the Lord." "Unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given; and the government shall be upon His shoulder; and His name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace."  {ST, October 10, 1900 par. 4}
 
 
Satan is ever ready to offer resistance to the work that Christ is willing to do for the souls of men. Jesus asks, "Is not this a brand plucked out of the fire?" Have I not chosen this people for myself? Although they have transgressed, the command is given, "Take away the filthy garments." This will be said concerning every soul that truly repents of sin, and believes in Christ. The righteousness of Christ will be imparted unto him. Christ came to bring divine power to man, to clothe him in his righteousness. He says, "I have graven thee upon the palms of my hands." He knows us by name. He knows all our trials and sorrows. He has wept and prayed, and he knows how to succor everyone who mourns. Satan will tell you that you cannot hope in God's mercy; that you are too great a sinner to be saved. But you should tell him that Jesus has said, "I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance."  {ST, September 16, 1889 par. 2}
 
 
Those who rejected the testimony of John were unwilling to receive the testimony of him of whom John declared, "He must increase, but I must decrease." The scribes, Pharisees, and rulers were determined that they would not see the evidences of truth, and they evaded the most manifest conclusions. To justify their course of stubborn unbelief, they lost no possible opportunity of seizing upon anything in the teaching of Jesus that they could misconstrue, misapply, or falsify. When there was no possibility of misapplying the truth of Christ's words, these men who rejected the counsel of God against themselves, started questions that had no reference to the matter in hand, so as to attract the attention of the people away from the lesson that Jesus sought to teach, and adroitly evade the truth. The Pharisees were not blindly opposing the doctrines  of Christ; for the truth made deep impressions upon their minds; but they resisted truth, and went contrary to their convictions, closing their eyes lest they should see, hardening the heart, lest they should perceive, and be converted, and Christ should heal them. In their self-righteousness they were too proud to accept the help that Christ came to bring to them.  {RH, October 18, 1892 par. 3}
 
So deep was the Lord's interest in the beings He had created, so great His love for the world, that He "gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life" (John 3:16). Christ came to bring moral power to man, to elevate, ennoble, and strengthen him, enabling him to be a partaker of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust. He proved to the inhabitants of the unfallen worlds and to human beings that the law can be kept. While possessing the nature of man, He obeyed the law of God, vindicating God's justice in demanding that it be obeyed. In the judgment His life will be an unanswerable argument in favor of God's law.  {HP 38.3}
 
The question has been asked, How can there be an agreement between the statement, "I came not to send peace, but a sword," and the song sung by the angels when Christ was born in the manger at Bethlehem, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men"? The song of the angels is in harmony with the words of the prophet Isaiah, who, when he predicted the birth of Christ, declared Him to be the Prince of peace. The gospel is a glorious message of peace and good will to men; the blessing that Christ came to bring was that of harmony and peace. He left His throne of glory, and clothed His divinity with humanity, that He might bring back from apostasy to loyalty to God the children of men, and bind their hearts together and to the heart of Infinite Love. He came to present to a fallen world the remedy for sin, so that whosoever should believe on Him should not perish, but by becoming one with Him and the Father should have everlasting life. In this way He establishes the Christian brotherhood, and unites His followers in one faith, -- faith in Him as their personal Saviour.  {BEcho, March 12, 1894 par. 2}
 
The light is all contained in the great commandment of love. In the light of the love of Christ, the gospel is an open book. This is the true light, which Christ came to bring to the world. The Saviour's true disciples have received this love, and they do not perform one deceptive action. They do not, to gain advantage for themselves, make movements that would place others in a position of sore trial.  {RH, June 30, 1910 par. 13}
 
Adam fell through yielding to appetite. Man never could have overcome the power of appetite unless Christ had overcome in his behalf; but now man may obtain the victory. Christ came to bring divine power to unite with human effort, so that although we have been debased by perverted appetite, we may take courage, for we are prisoners of hope. We are not required to overcome in our own strength; by living faith we can grasp the hand of Infinite Power, and when Satan comes with his temptations, we can point to the cross of Calvary, and say, "Christ died for me; in his name I can and will overcome. I want the Eden home that Adam lost. I must, I will, fight the battles of the Lord, and become a victor, and have a place in the kingdom of glory."  {ST, August 4, 1890 par. 3}
 
 
Christ  came  to  bring  salvation
 
Christ came to bring salvation within the reach of all. Upon the cross of Calvary He paid the infinite redemption price for a lost world. His self-denial and self-sacrifice, His unselfish labor, His humiliation, above all, the offering up of His life, testifies to the depth of His love for fallen man. It was to seek and to save the lost that He came to earth. His mission was to sinners, sinners of every grade, of every tongue and nation. He paid the price for all, to ransom them and bring them into union and sympathy with Himself. The most erring, the most sinful, were not passed by; His labors were especially for those who most needed the salvation He came to bring. The greater their need of reform, the deeper was His interest, the greater His sympathy, and the more earnest His labors. His great heart of love was stirred to its depths for the ones whose condition was most hopeless and who most needed His transforming grace.  {5T 603.2}
 
 
Christ came to bring salvation within the reach of all. Upon the cross of Calvary he paid the infinite redemption-price for a world lost. His self-denial and self sacrifice, his unselfish labor, his humiliation, and, above all, the offering up of his life, testify of the depth of his love for fallen man. It was to seek and to save that which was lost that he came to earth. His mission was to sinners -- sinners of every grade, of every tongue and nation. He paid the price for all, to ransom them and bring them into union and sympathy with himself. The most erring, the most sinful, were not passed by; his labors were especially for those who most needed the salvation he came to bring. The greater their need of reform, the deeper was his interest, the greater his sympathy, and the more earnest his labors. His great heart of love was stirred to its depths for the ones who were the most hopeless, and who most needed his transforming grace.  {RH, November 30, 1886 par. 1}
 
 
Christ came to bring salvation within the reach of all. . . . The most erring, the most sinful, were not passed by; His labors were  especially for those who most needed the salvation He came to bring. The greater their need of reform, the deeper was His interest, the  greater His sympathy, and the more earnest His labors. His great heart of love was stirred to its depths for the ones whose condition was most hopeless and who most needed His transforming grace.  {HP 291.4}
 
Christ came to bring salvation within the reach of all. Upon the cross of Calvary he paid the infinite redemption price for a world lost. His self-denial and self-sacrifice, his unselfish labor, his humiliation, and, above all, the offering up of his life, testify of the depth of his love for fallen man. It was to seek and to save that which was lost that he came to earth. His mission was to sinners -- sinners of every grade, of every tongue and nation. He paid the ransom price for all. None were passed by, no matter how erring and sinful; his labors were especially for those who most needed the salvation he came to bring. His great heart of love was stirred to its depths for those who were the most hopeless, and who most needed his transforming grace.  {SW, September 29, 1908 par. 1}
 
Christ came to bring salvation within the reach of all. Upon the cross of Calvary He paid the infinite redemption price for a lost world. . . . His mission was to sinners, sinners of every grade, of every tongue and nation. . . . The most erring, the most sinful, were not passed by; His labors were especially for those who most needed the salvation He came to bring. The greater their need of reform, the deeper was His interest, the greater His sympathy, and the more earnest His labors. His great heart of love was stirred to its depths for the ones whose condition was most hopeless and who most needed His transforming grace. . . .  {AG 234.2}
 
 
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