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Popes mentioned by Name Section
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .
 
Pope  Gregory
  
Pope  Gregory  VII
Pope  from 1073  to  1085    Biography
Another step in papal assumption was taken, when, in the eleventh century, Pope Gregory VII proclaimed the perfection of the Roman Church. Among the propositions which he put forth was one declaring that the church had never erred, nor would it ever err, according to the Scriptures. But the Scripture proofs did not accompany the assertion. The proud pontiff also claimed the power to depose emperors, and declared that no sentence which he pronounced could be reversed by anyone, but that it was his prerogative to reverse the decisions of all others. (See Appendix.)  {GC 57.2}
A striking illustration of the tyrannical character of this advocate of infallibility was given in his treatment of the German emperor, Henry IV. For presuming to disregard the pope's authority, this monarch was declared to be excommunicated and dethroned. Terrified by the desertion and threats of his own princes, who were encouraged in rebellion against him by the papal mandate, Henry felt the necessity of making his peace with Rome. In company with his wife and a faithful servant he crossed the Alps in midwinter, that he might humble himself before the pope. Upon reaching the castle whither Gregory had withdrawn, he was conducted, without his guards, into an outer court, and there, in the severe cold of winter, with uncovered head and naked feet, and in a miserable dress, he awaited the pope's permission to come into his presence. Not until he had continued three days fasting and making confession, did the pontiff condescend to grant him pardon. Even then it was only upon condition that the emperor should await the sanction of the pope before resuming the insignia or exercising the power of royalty. And Gregory, elated with his triumph, boasted that it was his duty to pull down the pride of kings.  Great Controversy, page 57.3
 
The gospel had been planted in Bohemia as early as the ninth century. The Bible was translated, and public worship was conducted, in the language of the people. But as the power of the pope increased, so the word of God was obscured. Gregory VII, who had taken it upon himself to humble the pride of kings, was no less intent upon enslaving the people, and accordingly a bull was issued forbidding public worship to be conducted in the Bohemian tongue. The pope declared that "it was pleasing to the Omnipotent that His worship should be celebrated in an unknown language, and that many evils and heresies had arisen from not observing this rule."-- Wylie, b. 3, ch. 1. Thus Rome decreed that the light of God's word should be extinguished and the people should be shut up in darkness. But Heaven had provided other agencies for the preservation of the church. Many of the Waldenses and Albigenses, driven by persecution from their homes in France and Italy, came to Bohemia. Though they dared not teach openly, they labored zealously in secret. Thus the true faith was preserved from century to century.  Great Controversy, page 97.1
 
 
Pope Gregory XI
 
Pope from 1370 to 1378     Biography
But the arrival of the papal bulls laid upon all England a peremptory command for the arrest and imprisonment of the heretic. These measures pointed directly to the stake. It appeared certain that Wycliffe must soon fall a prey to the vengeance of Rome. But He who declared to one of old, "Fear not: . . . I am thy shield" (Genesis 15:1), again stretched out His hand to protect His servant. Death came, not to the Reformer, but to the pontiff who had decreed his destruction. Gregory XI died, and the ecclesiastics who had assembled for Wycliffe's trial, dispersed.  Great Controversy, page 86.1
 
 
Pope Gregory XIII
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_Gregory_XIII
"When the news of the massacre reached Rome, the exultation among the clergy knew no bounds. The cardinal of Lorraine rewarded the messenger with a thousand crowns; the cannon of St. Angelo thundered forth a joyous salute; and bells rang out from every steeple; bonfires turned night into day; and Gregory XIII,attended by the cardinals and other ecclesiastical dignitaries, went in long procession to the church of St. Louis, where the cardinal of Lorraine chanted a Te Deum. . . . A medal was struck to commemorate the massacre, and in the Vatican may still be seen three frescoes of Vasari, describing the attack upon the admiral, the king in council plotting the massacre, and the massacre itself. Gregory sent Charles the Golden Rose; and four months after the massacre, . . . he listened complacently to the sermon of a French priest, . . . who spoke of 'that day so full of happiness and joy, when the most holy father received the news, and went in solemn state to render thanks to God and St. Louis.'"-- Henry White, The Massacre of St. Bartholomew, ch. 14, par. 34.  Great Controversy, page 272.3
 
 
"The pope, Gregory XIII., received the news of the fate of the Huguenots with unbounded joy. The wish of his heart had been gratified, and Charles IX, was now his favorite son. Rome rang with rejoicings. The guns of the castle of St. Angelo gave forth a joyous salute; the bells sounded from every tower; bonfires blazed throughout the night; and Gregory, attended by his cardinals and priests, led the magnificent procession to the church of St. Louis, where the cardinal of Lorraine chanted a Te Deum. The cry of the dying host in France was gentle harmony to the court of Rome. A medal was struck to commemorate the glorious massacre; a picture, which still exists in the Vatican, was painted, representing the chief events of St. Bartholomew. The pope, eager to show his gratitude to Charles for his dutiful conduct, sent him the Golden Rose; and from the pulpits of Rome eloquent preachers celebrated Charles, Catherine, and the Guises as the new founders of the papal church."  {GC88 272.3}
 
  
Pope  Gregory  XVI
 
THE CORRECT REFERENCE FOR THE FIRST CITATION IS POPE GREGORY XVI'S ENCYCLICAL LETTER OF AUGUST 15, 1832.  THE RELEVANT PARAGRAPH IS HERE QUOTED IN FULL:  LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE
     "THIS SHAMEFUL FONT OF INDIFFERENTISM GIVES RISE TO THAT ABSURD AND ERRONEOUS PROPOSITION WHICH CLAIMS THAT LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE MUST BE MAINTAINED FOR EVERYONE.  IT SPREADS RUIN IN SACRED AND CIVIL AFFAIRS, THOUGH SOME REPEAT OVER AND OVER AGAIN WITH THE GREATEST IMPUDENCE THAT SOME ADVANTAGE ACCRUES TO RELIGION FROM IT. ‘BUT THE DEATH OF THE SOUL IS WORSE THAN FREEDOM OF ERROR,' AS AUGUSTINE WAS WONT TO SAY.  WHEN ALL RESTRAINTS ARE REMOVED BY WHICH MEN ARE KEPT ON THE NARROW PATH OF TRUTH, THEIR NATURE, WHICH IS ALREADY INCLINED TO EVIL, PROPELS THEM TO RUIN.  THEN TRULY ‘THE BOTTOMLESS PIT' IS OPENED FROM WHICH JOHN SAW SMOKE ASCENDING WHICH OBSCURED THE SUN, AND OUT OF WHICH LOCUSTS FLEW FORTH TO DEVASTATE THE EARTH.  THENCE COMES TRANSFORMATION OF MINDS, CORRUPTION OF YOUTHS, CONTEMPT OF SACRED THINGS AND HOLY LAWS--IN OTHER WORDS, A PESTILENCE MORE DEADLY TO THE STATE THAN ANY OTHER.  EXPERIENCE SHOWS, EVEN FROM EARLIEST TIMES, THAT CITIES RENOWNED FOR WEALTH, DOMINION, AND GLORY PERISHED AS A RESULT OF THIS SINGLE EVIL, NAMELY IMMODERATE FREEDOM OF OPINION, LICENSE OF FREE SPEECH, AND DESIRE FOR NOVELTY."--AS PRINTED IN CLAUDIA CARLEN, IHM, THE PAPAL ENCYCLICALS, 1740-1878 (ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN: THE PIERIAN PRESS, 1990), VOL. 1, P. 238.  {GC 694.2}
 
 
 
 
PAGE 56. FORGED WRITINGS.-- AMONG THE DOCUMENTS THAT AT THE PRESENT TIME ARE GENERALLY ADMITTED TO BE FORGERIES, THE DONATION OF CONSTANTINE AND THE PSEUDO-ISIDORIAN DECRETALS ARE OF PRIMARY IMPORTANCE. "THE 'DONATION OF CONSTANTINE' IS THE NAME TRADITIONALLY APPLIED, SINCE THE LATER MIDDLE AGES, TO A DOCUMENT PURPORTING TO HAVE BEEN ADDRESSED BY CONSTANTINE THE GREAT TO POPE SYLVESTER I, WHICH IS FOUND FIRST IN A PARISIAN MANUSCRIPT (CODEX LAT. 2777) OF PROBABLY THE BEGINNING OF THE NINTH CENTURY. SINCE THE ELEVENTH CENTURY IT HAS BEEN USED AS A POWERFUL ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF THE PAPAL CLAIMS, AND CONSEQUENTLY SINCE THE TWELFTH IT HAS BEEN THE SUBJECT OF A VIGOROUS CONTROVERSY. AT THE SAME TIME, BY RENDERING IT POSSIBLE TO REGARD THE PAPACY AS A MIDDLE TERM BETWEEN THE ORIGINAL AND THE MEDIEVAL ROMAN EMPIRE, AND THUS TO FORM A THEORETICAL BASIS OF CONTINUITY FOR THE RECEPTION OF THE ROMAN LAW IN THE MIDDLE AGES, IT HAS HAD NO SMALL INFLUENCE UPON SECULAR HISTORY."--THE NEW SCHAFF-HERZOG ENCYCLOPEDIA OF RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE, VOL. 3, ART. "DONATION OF CONSTANTINE," PP. 484, 485.  {GC 681.2}
 
 
Pope  Pius IX
Pope  from  1846  to 1878    Biography
"The Constitution of the United States guarantees liberty of conscience. Nothing is dearer or more fundamental. Pope Pius IX., in his Encyclical Letter of August 15, 1854, said: 'The absurd and erroneous doctrines or ravings in defense of liberty of conscience, are a most pestilential error -- a pest, of all others, most to be dreaded in a State.' The same pope, in his Encyclical Letter of December 8, 1864, anathematized 'those who assert the liberty of conscience and of religious worship,' also 'all such as maintain that the church may not employ force.'  {GC88 564.4}  {GC 564.5}
 
 
 
 
Pope  Innocent  III
Pope  from  1198  to  1216    Biography
History testifies of her artful and persistent efforts to insinuate herself into the affairs of nations; and having gained a foothold, to further her own aims, even at the ruin of princes and people. In the year 1204, Pope Innocent III extracted from Peter II, king of Arragon, the following extraordinary oath: "I, Peter, king of Arragonians, profess and promise to be ever faithful and obedient to my lord, Pope Innocent, to his Catholic successors, and the Roman Church, and faithfully to preserve my kingdom in his obedience, defending the Catholic faith, and persecuting heretical pravity." -- John Dowling, The History of Romanism, b. 5, ch. 6, sec. 55. This is in harmony with the claims regarding the power of the Roman pontiff "that it is lawful for him to depose emperors" and "that he can absolve subjects from their allegiance to unrighteous rulers."-- Mosheim, b. 3, cent. 11, pt. 2, ch. 2, sec. 9, note 17. (See also Appendix note for page 447.)  {GC 580.3}
  
 
 
Pope  Urban  VI
Pope from 1378 to 1389     Biography
In closing he said: "Let us pray unto our God, that he will so stir up our pope, Urban the Sixth, as he began, that he with his clergy may follow the Lord Jesus Christ in life and manners, and that they may teach the people effectually, and that they likewise may faithfully follow them in the same."  {GC88 91.5}  Great Controversy, page 92.1
 
 
 
 
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