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Must learn the lesson of . . . (17 ) lessons (5)
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .
 
must  learn  the  lesson  of  . . .
Related phrase:   must learn the lessons of . . .   ( 5 )
 It would be well for us to spend a thoughtful hour each day in contemplation of the life of Christ. We should take it point by point, and let the imagination grasp each scene, especially the closing ones. As we thus dwell upon His great sacrifice for us, our confidence in Him will be more constant, our love will be quickened, and we shall be more deeply imbued with His spirit. If we would be saved at last, we must learn the lesson of penitence and humiliation at the foot of the cross.  {DA 83.4}
 
 
His ministry was nearly completed; he had only a few more lessons to impart. And that they might never forget the humility of the pure and spotless Lamb of God, the great and efficacious Sacrifice for man humbled himself to wash the feet of his disciples. It will do you good, and our ministers generally, frequently to review the closing scenes in the life of our Redeemer. Here, beset with temptations as he was, we may all learn lessons of the utmost importance to us. It would be well to spend a thoughtful hour each day reviewing the life of Christ from the manger to Calvary. We should take it point by point, and let the imagination vividly grasp each scene, especially the closing ones of his earthly life. By thus contemplating his teachings and sufferings, and the infinite sacrifice made by him for the redemption of the race, we may strengthen our faith, quicken our love, and become more deeply imbued with the spirit which sustained our Saviour. If we would be saved at last, we must learn the lesson of penitence and faith at the foot of the cross. . . . Everything noble and generous in man will respond to the contemplation of Christ upon the cross.  {GW92 246.1}
 
 
As Satan failed utterly in his attempt to cause Christ to sin, so he will fail of overcoming us, if we will act sensibly. Let us firmly resolve that when the enemy tempts us to speak hastily, feeling that we are treated unjustly or are misunderstood, we will not open our lips. If we should speak even one word in reply, the enemy would be almost sure to gain the victory. We must learn the lesson of silence. With tongues bridled, we may be victorious in every trial of patience through which we are called to pass.  -  {ST, February 18, 1903 par. 9}
 
The enemy of God and man has worked with every conceivable device to insnare souls; and when he can lead the members of the church to pour their trials into the ears of the minister, the confederacy of evil rejoices. Through this very trust, ministers fall under temptation, and fail to look to Jesus every moment. Christ has said, "Without me ye can do nothing" that is acceptable to God. But when the agent thinks that he is something, when he is nothing; for he frequently has no living connection with God, he is only a broken reed to those who lean upon him. But it is the privilege of every child of God to look to Him who is the author and finisher of their faith. Every child of God must learn the lesson of entire trust in Jesus. "What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us? He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things? Who shall lay anything to the charge of God's elect? It is God that justifieth. Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also maketh intercession for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, For thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter. Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor light, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord."  {RH, January 17, 1893 par. 13}
 
The cross teaches the lesson of self-sacrifice. As by faith men behold the royal Sufferer, the conviction comes to them that the sure result of sin is death. Let the believing soul stand beside the cross of Calvary, and with a heart swelling with grateful love, cry, "Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world!" Behold Him! Say it with heart and soul and voice. Induce the sinner to look. When his gaze is arrested, amazed at such wonderful condescension, he steps nearer, and learns of the Saviour the lesson all must learn, -- the lesson of meekness and lowliness. The believing soul sees Jesus as He is, and beholding, is changed into His image. The experience of those who are truly converted testifies that God is the author of eternal salvation, and that the grace of Christ is wisdom and power.  {RH, January 7, 1902 par. 11}
 
 
must  learn  the  lesson  of  obedience
Children and youth are to be taught that their capabilities were given them for the honor and glory of God. To this end they must learn the lesson of obedience; for only by lives of willing obedience can they render to God the service he requires. Before the child is old enough to reason, he may be taught to obey. By gentle, persistent effort, the habit should be established. Thus to a great degree may be prevented those later conflicts between will and authority that do so much to create in the minds of the youth alienation and bitterness toward parents and teachers, and too often resistance of all authority, human and divine.  {RH, October 5, 1911 par. 2}
 
Parents must learn the lesson of implicit obedience to God's voice, which speaks to them out of His Word; and as they learn this lesson, they can teach their children respect and obedience in word and action. This is the work that should be carried on in the home. Those who do it will reach upward themselves, realizing that they must elevate their children. This education means much more than mere instruction.  {CG 24.4}
 
The children are to be taught that their capabilities were given them for the honor and glory of God. To this end they must learn the lesson of obedience, for only by lives of willing obedience can they render to God the service He requires. Before the child is old enough to reason, he must be taught to obey. By gentle, persistent effort the habit should be established. Thus to a great degree may be prevented those later conflicts between will and authority that do so much to arouse in the minds of the youth alienation and bitterness toward parents and teachers, and too often resistance of all authority, human and divine.  {CT 110.4}
 
 
must  learn  the  lesson  that .  .  .  ( 5 )
 
Christ has given us no assurance that to attain perfection of character is an easy matter. It is a conflict, a battle, a march, day after day. All who reach the standard must learn the lesson that it is through much tribulation that we enter the kingdom of heaven. If we sit with Christ on His throne, we must be partakers with Him of His suffering. "It became Him . . .  in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the Captain of our salvation perfect through suffering" (Hebrews 2:10). "Though He were a Son, yet learned He obedience by the things which He suffered" (Hebrews 5:8). Shall we then be timid and cowardly because of the trials we meet as we advance? Shall we not meet them without repining and complaints? . . .  {10MR 167.2}
 
 
God's servants, who have had great light and blessing from Him, are not to be like a blast of hail, on any occasion, to beat down and destroy. The salt that is to save from corruption is the confession of the truth, the revelation of the love of Christ. The magnifying of the law of Jehovah is not accomplished by breaking its principles. God cannot manifest His power to exalt the human agent; it is truth that is to bear away the victory. And Christ's ambassadors must learn the lesson that sharp speeches and word-thrusts bring no victory. {13MR 315.2}
 
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