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Contemplation of Christ ( 26 )
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .
 
Contemplation  of  Christ
 
It would be well to spend a thoughtful hour each day reviewing the life of Christ from the manger to Calvary. We should take it point by point and let the imagination vividly grasp each scene, especially the closing ones of His earthly life. By thus contemplating His teachings and sufferings, and the infinite sacrifice made by Him for the redemption of the race, we may strengthen our faith, quicken our love, and become more deeply imbued with the spirit which sustained our Saviour. If we would be saved at last we must all learn the lesson of penitence and faith at the foot of the cross. . . . Everything noble and generous in man will respond to the contemplation of Christ upon the cross.  {Mar 77.4}
 
 
His ministry was nearly completed; He had only a few more lessons to impart. And that they might never forget the humility of the pure and spotless Lamb of God, the great and efficacious Sacrifice for man humbled Himself to wash the feet of His disciples. It will do you good, and our ministers generally, to frequently review the closing scenes in the life of our Redeemer. Here, beset with temptations as He was, we may all learn lessons of the utmost importance to us. It would be well to spend a thoughtful hour each day reviewing the life of Christ from the manger to Calvary. We should take it point by point and let the imagination vividly grasp each scene, especially the closing ones of His earthly life. By thus contemplating His teachings and sufferings, and the infinite sacrifice made by Him for the redemption of the race, we may strengthen our faith, quicken our love, and become more deeply imbued with the spirit which sustained our Saviour. If we would be saved at last we must all learn the lesson of penitence and faith at the foot of the cross. Christ suffered humiliation to save us from everlasting disgrace. He consented to have scorn, mockery, and abuse fall upon Him in order to shield us. It was our transgression that gathered the veil of darkness about His divine soul and extorted the cry from Him, as of one smitten and forsaken of God. He bore our sorrows; He was put to grief for our sins. He made Himself an offering for sin, that we might be justified before God through Him. Everything noble and generous in man will respond to the contemplation of Christ upon the cross.  {4T 374.1}
 
If we would be saved at last we must all learn the lesson of penitence and faith at the foot of the cross. Christ suffered humiliation to save us from everlasting disgrace. He consented to have scorn, mockery, and abuse fall upon Him in order to shield us. It was our transgression that gathered the veil of darkness about His divine soul and extorted the cry from Him, as of one smitten and forsaken of God. He bore our sorrows; He was put to grief for our sins. He made Himself an offering for sin, that we might be justified before God through Him. Everything noble and generous in man will respond to the contemplation of Christ upon the cross. . . .  {LHU 240.4}
 
 
In the contemplation of Christ we linger on the shore of a love that is measureless. We endeavor to tell of this love, and language fails us. We consider His life on earth, His sacrifice for us, His work in heaven as our advocate, and the mansions He is preparing for those who love Him, and we can only exclaim, O the height and depth of the love of Christ! "Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us, and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins." "Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God." 1 John 4:10; 3:1.  {AA 333.3}
 
His ministry was nearly completed; he had only a few more lessons to impart. And that they might never forget the humility of the pure and spotless Lamb of God, the great and efficacious Sacrifice for man humbled himself to wash the feet of his disciples. It will do you good, and our ministers generally, frequently to review the closing scenes in the life of our Redeemer. Here, beset with temptations as he was, we may all learn lessons of the utmost importance to us. It would be well to spend a thoughtful hour each day reviewing the life of Christ from the manger to Calvary. We should take it point by point, and let the imagination vividly grasp each scene, especially the closing ones of his earthly life. By thus contemplating his teachings and sufferings, and the infinite sacrifice made by him for the redemption of the race, we may strengthen our faith, quicken our love, and become more deeply imbued with the spirit which sustained our Saviour. If we would be saved at last, we must learn the lesson of penitence and faith at the foot of the cross. . . . Everything noble and generous in man will respond to the contemplation of Christ upon the cross.  {GW92 246.1}
 
The people listened as if spellbound. The bread of life was broken to those starving souls. Christ was lifted up before them as above popes, legates, emperors, and kings. Luther made no reference to his own perilous position. He did not seek to make himself the object of thought or sympathy. In the contemplation of Christ he had lost sight of self. He hid behind the Man of Calvary, seeking only to present Jesus as the sinner's Redeemer.  Great Controversy, page 152.4
 
It is proper to seek to learn all that is possible from nature, but do not fail to look from nature to Christ for the complete representation of the character of the living God. By contemplation of Christ, by conformity to the divine likeness, your conceptions of the divine character will expand, and your mind and heart will be elevated, refined, and ennobled. Let the youth aim high, not relying upon human wisdom, but living day by day as seeing Him who is invisible, doing their work as in the sight of the intelligences of heaven. . . .  {HP 16.6}
 
By faith the soul catches divine light from Jesus. We see matchless charms in his purity and humility, his self-denial, his wonderful sacrifice to save fallen man. Contemplation of Christ leads man to place a proper estimate upon himself, for he realizes that the love of God has made him great. "And every man that hath this hope in him purifieth himself, even as he is pure." The possibility of being like Jesus, whom he loves and adores, inspires within him that faith which works by love and purifies the heart.  {RH, October 7, 1890 par. 14}
 
In Christ the character of the Father was made manifest, and, by contemplation of Christ, we may be changed into the same image. We are to represent Christ to the world as he represented the Father. By appropriating the righteousness of Christ, we represent not only the character of Christ, but also the character of the Father. We can have a knowledge of God only through a knowledge of Christ. Christ declared, "He that hath seen me hath seen the Father." Christ was the brightness of his Father's glory. Turning from every other representation of God as dim and veiled in comparison, we may, with open face, behold in Christ the glory of the Lord.  {ST, May 18, 1891 par. 6}
 
 
enjoys  contemplation  of  Christ
 
He who believes in Christ becomes one with Christ, to show forth the glory of God, for God hath put a new song into his mouth, even praise unto the Lord. He daily desires to know more of Christ, that he may become more like Him. He discerns spiritual things and enjoys contemplation of Christ, and by beholding Him he is changed, imperceptibly to himself, into the image of Christ. . . . He does not place his dependence for acceptance with God upon what he can do, but relies wholly upon the merits of Christ's righteousness. Yet he knows that he cannot be slothful and be a child of God. He searches the Scriptures that testify to him of Christ, that present before him the perfect Pattern. . . .  {TMK 158.2}
 
 
"God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ." He who believes in Christ becomes one with Christ, to show forth the glory of God; for God hath put a new song into his mouth, even praise unto the Lord. He daily desires to know more of Christ, that he may become more like him. He discerns spiritual things, and enjoys contemplation of Christ; and by beholding him, he is changed, imperceptibly to himself, into the image of Christ. He is after the Spirit, and understands the things of the Spirit. He does not place his dependence for acceptance with God upon what he can do, but relies wholly upon the merits of Christ's righteousness. Yet he knows that he cannot be slothful and be a child of God. He searches the Scriptures that testify to him of Christ, that present before him the perfect Pattern.  {YI, December 22, 1892 par. 1}  {YI, August 17, 1909 par. 1}
 
 
 
 
 
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