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Abhorrence of Sin ( 25 )
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Quotations from the writings of Ellen G. White with the phrase . . .
 
Abhorrence  of  Sin
Related Phrases:     Abhorrence of Evil  - - Hatred of Sin 
That which in God's dealing with us may seem to be hardship, is really mercy at every step, arousing the higher nature, and causing an abhorrence of sin and injustice, and leading us to guard against selfish practices, against artifice and injustice, against every defective trait of character. If men would practice the attributes of God, they would not have the painful consciousness of transmitting wrong tendencies and traits of character to their children, to be reproduced in their children, thus communicating the evils that might have been repressed. I merely touch upon these points now, but hope to write more fully at another time.  {1888 1399.1}
 
 
The heart of Christ is constantly drawn out in sympathy toward fallen man. While upon earth, his only mission was to save sinners. He had a deep abhorrence of sin, while exercising the tenderest compassion toward the sinner. He was grieved and wounded at heart because men failed to value and accept his love. The Majesty of heaven veiled his divinity in humanity, and passed from place to place through towns and cities, teaching the truth and working miracles, and though multitudes flocked to hear him, few were in sympathy with the lessons of truth he presented, which alone could save the soul.  {RH, December 20, 1892 par. 5}
 
 
As time passed on, David's sin toward Bathsheba became known, and suspicion was excited that he had planned the death of Uriah. The Lord was dishonored. He had favored and exalted David, and David's sin misrepresented the character of God and cast reproach upon His name. It tended to lower the standard of godliness in Israel, to lessen in many minds the abhorrence of sin; while those who did not love and fear God were by it emboldened in transgression.  {CC 179.2}
 
For the sake of Israel also there was a necessity for God to interpose. As time passed on, David's sin toward Bathsheba became known, and suspicion was excited that he had planned the death of Uriah. The Lord was dishonored. He had favored and exalted David, and David's sin misrepresented the character of God and cast reproach upon His name. It tended to lower the standard of godliness in Israel, to lessen in many minds the abhorrence of sin; while those who did not love and fear God were by it emboldened in transgression.  {PP 720.4}
 
Will the professed followers of Christ cleanse the soul-temple of its defilement? Will those who profess to be his representatives sacrifice anything and everything rather than offend God? A deep-settled conviction is needed in every soul to strengthen the abhorrence of sin. Meditation should be encouraged. We should view ourselves as ever in the presence of God, whose eye searches the soul and reads the most secret thoughts. Since we know this to be true, why is there such a careless disregard of God's claims? Why such thoughtlessness in regard to the solemn realities of life?  {RH, June 3, 1880 par. 11}
 
Efforts to educate children in the fear of the Lord, without making the study of the Word prominent, are sadly misdirected. Unless there is such a training as will lead to a recognition and an abhorrence of sin, moral deformity will result. Our children should be removed from the evil influences of the public schools, and placed where thoroughly converted teachers may educate them in the Holy Scriptures. The students in our schools should take the Word of God as the grand rule of their lives.  {RH, July 25, 1907 par. 17}
 
Moses represents a class who will call sin by its right name; a class that will give no place to sin and wrong, but will purge it from among them. Our abhorrence of sin cannot be too strong, if we are controlled by no personal, selfish feelings, if we labor disinterestedly for the salvation of souls, pleading in behalf of the erring, and those blinded by their own transgressions.  {ST, May 27, 1880 par. 5}
 
While the servants of God are in constant danger of indulging a zeal that is wholly human, and while great harm is done by those who seem to be in their element in censuring, reproving, and condemning their brethren, there is fully as great danger of going to the opposite extreme, and making the sum and substance of Christian duty consist in love. The apostle Paul writes to his son Timothy, "Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all long-suffering and doctrine." This work is just as essential to the prosperity of the church as is the exercise of gentleness, forbearance and love. Those who are consecrated to God will be as faithful to reprove and rebuke sin with all long-suffering and doctrine, as to comfort and encourage the desponding, and strengthen the weak. All who love God will show their abhorrence of sin.  {ST, May 5, 1881 par. 16}
 
abhorring  sin
Those who work in the fear of God to rid the church of hindrances and to correct grievous wrongs, that the people of God may see the necessity of abhorring sin and may prosper in purity, and that the name of God may be glorified, will ever meet with resisting influences from the unconsecrated. Zephaniah thus describes the true state of this class and the terrible judgments that will come upon them:  {3T 270.3}  Read entire section
 
 
God's  Abhorrence  of  Sin
 
But the history of David furnishes no countenance to sin. It was when he was walking in the counsel of God that he was called a man after God's own heart. When he sinned, this ceased to be true of him until by repentance he had returned to the Lord. The word of God plainly declares, "The thing that David had done was evil in the eyes of the Lord." 2 Samuel 11:27, margin.  And the Lord said to David by the prophet, "Wherefore hast thou despised the commandment of the Lord, to do evil in His sight? . . . Now therefore the sword shall never depart from thine house; because thou hast despised Me." Though David repented of his sin and was forgiven and accepted by the Lord, he reaped the baleful harvest of the seed he himself had sown. The judgments upon him and upon his house testify to God's abhorrence of the sin.   Patriarchs & Prophets, page 723.1    Entire Chapter 71
 
 
As Satan had led man to sin, he had hoped that God's abhorrence of sin would forever separate Him from man, and break the connecting link between heaven and earth. The opening heavens, in connection with the voice of God addressing His Son, was like a death knell to Satan. He feared that God was now to unite man more fully to Himself, and give power to overcome his devices. And for this purpose Christ had come from the royal courts to the earth. Satan was well acquainted with the position of honor Christ had held in heaven as the Son of God, the beloved of the Father. And that He should leave heaven, and come to this world as a man, filled him with apprehension for his safety. He could not comprehend the mystery of this great sacrifice for the benefit of fallen man. He knew that the value of heaven far exceeded the anticipation and appreciation of fallen man. The most costly treasures of the world, he knew, would not compare with its worth. As he had lost through his rebellion all the riches and pure glories of heaven, he was determined to be revenged by causing as many as he could to undervalue heaven and to place their affections upon earthly treasures. {Con 29.2}  {RH, March 3, 1874 par. 21}  {ST, April 5, 1883 par. 7}  {2Red 27.2}
 
When Satan led man to sin, he hoped that God's abhorrence of sin would forever separate Him from man, and break the connecting link between heaven and earth. When from the opening heavens he heard the voice of God addressing His Son, it was to him as the sound of a death knell. It told him that now God was about to unite man more closely to Himself, and give moral power to overcome temptation, and to escape from the entanglements of satanic devices. Satan well knew the position which Christ had held in heaven as the Son of God, the Beloved of the Father; and that Christ should leave the joy and honor of heaven, and come to this world as a man, filled him with apprehension. He knew that this condescension on the part of the Son of God boded no good to him. . . .  {5BC 1078.4}
 
When the law was first read to him, Josiah had rent his clothes to signify to the people that he was much troubled because he had not known of this book before, and that he was ashamed and painfully distressed because of the works and ways of the people, who had transgressed God's law. As he had in the past seen the idolatry and the impiety existing among them, he had been much troubled. Now as he read in the book of the law of the punishment that would surely follow such practises, great sorrow filled his heart. Never before had he so fully realized God's abhorrence for sin.  {GCB, April 1, 1903 par. 9}
 
  
His  Abhorrence  of  Sin
 
The whole ceremony was designed to impress the Israelites with the holiness of God and his abhorrence of sin, and, further, to show them that they could not come in contact with sin without becoming polluted. Every man was required to afflict his soul while this work of atonement was going forward. All business was laid aside, and the whole congregation of Israel spent the day in solemn humiliation before God, with prayer, fasting, and deep searching of heart.  {4SP 264.2}  Great Controversy, page 419.3  
 
 
More than two thousand years have passed by since Ezra "prepared his heart to seek the law of the Lord, and to do it;" yet this long lapse of time has not lessened the influence of his pious example. Throughout the centuries, the record of his life of consecration has been an inspiration to many who have determined to "seek the law of the Lord, and to do it." His steadfastness of purpose, his careful methods of study, his diligence in teaching the Holy Scriptures to the common people, his unwavering trust in God, his abhorrence of sin, his patience and kindly consideration in dealing with the erring,--these and other striking characteristics of his life have had an ennobling influence on the lives of many who have been impressed by the Holy Spirit to emulate his example. Ezra's motives were high and holy; all that he did was actuated by an intense love for souls. And to the end of time, the compassion and tenderness that he ever revealed toward those who had sinned either wilfully or through ignorance, should be an object-lesson to all who seek to bring about reforms. God desires his servants to be as firm and unyielding as a rock, where right principles are involved; and yet, withal, they are to manifest the kindly sympathy and the forbearance revealed in the lives of Ezra and of Christ. Like Ezra, they are to teach transgressors the words of life, which contain principles that are the foundation of all right-doing.  {RH, February 27, 1908 par. 2}
 
 
These and similar passages revealed to Josiah God's love for His people and His abhorrence of sin. As the king read the prophecies of swift judgment upon those who should persist in rebellion, he trembled for the future. The perversity of Judah had been great; what was to be the outcome of their continued apostasy?  {PK 396.1}
These and similar passages revealed to Josiah God's love for his people, and his abhorrence of sin.  As the king read the prophecies of swift judgment upon those who should persist in rebellion, he trembled for the future. The perversity of Judah had been great; what was to be the outcome of their continued apostasy?  {RH, July 22, 1915 par. 13}
 
 
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